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Assessment item 1 Length: 500 words (excluding questions and references) APA reference style I need 4 references ( mainly use text book for the assignment and reference) Task 1. What are professional...

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Assessment item 1
Length: 500 words (excluding questions and references)
APA reference style
I need 4 references ( mainly use text book for the assignment and reference)
Task
1. What are professional ethics?
2. How are professional ethics regulated?
3. What is the definition of ethics and what is its purpose?
4. What is an ethical dilemma and how might Utilitarianism assist in addressing an ethical dilemma?
5. Give an example of ‘the golden rule’ in a business context.
6. What is a consequential ethical theory?
7. What is a non-consequential ethical theory?
8. What are three principles of Immanuelle Kant’s ethical theories?
9. What is Virtue Ethics and is it a consequential or non-consequential theory?
10. What is meant by informed consent? Give an example .
Marking criteria
    Assessment Item 1 - Marking Criteria
    Criterion
    High Distinction 
(HD)
    Distinction
(DI)
    Credit
(CR)
    Pass
(PS)
    Fail
(FL)
     
    8.5-10
    7.5-8
    6.5-7
    5-6
    <5
    Academic skills
(10)
    Eloquent writing.
All sources acknowledged.
Referencing that fully complies with the CSU Guide to Referencing: APA style.
The student clearly and comprehensively addresses the task
    Clear and succinct writing.
All sources acknowledged.
Referencing that mostly complies with the CSU Guide to Referencing: APA style.
The student addresses the task well.
    Good writing, with fewer than six e
ors (grammar, punctuation, spelling)
All sources acknowledged.
Referencing that mostly complies with the CSU Guide to Referencing: APA style.
The student addresses the task
    Writing has e
ors but the work is easy to understand.
Referencing that fully complies with the CSU Guide to Referencing: APA style.
The student addresses the task but responses are basic.
    The student has not addressed the task adequately.
All criteria for a passing mark have not been met.
    Responses
(20 marks)
    The student clearly demonstrates an excellent understanding of the concepts raised in the questions.
Comprehensive definitions have been given, along with deep and thoughtful reflections to demonstrate understanding.
MGT211 resources have been used effectively.
    The student demonstrates a solid understanding of the concepts raised in the questions.
Clear definitions have been given, along with thoughtful reflections to demonstrate understanding.
MGT211 resources have been used effectively.
    The student demonstrates a good understanding of the concepts raised in the questions.
Definitions have been given, along with reflections to demonstrate understanding.
MGT211 resources have been used effectively.
    The student demonstrates a basic understanding of the concepts raised in the questions.
Definitions have been given, but these rely too much on quotes and show little evidence of deep understanding.
The student has made an attempted to reflect, but the reflections are rather superficial.
MGT211 resources have been used effectively. Some flaws in logic may be evident.
    The student has not addressed the task adequately.
    
 
 
Presentation
Please adhere to the following guidelines:
1. Use a standard 12pt font such as Times New Roman, Cali
i or Arial

someTitle
PART 1
SEEING THE
MORAL DIMENSION
IN BUSINESS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 1 Seeing the moral dimension of business
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 2 Normative theories of ethics
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2William, S., Vincent, B., Theodora, I., Shaw, W. H., & Muntean, D XXXXXXXXXXMoral issues in business. Retrieved from http:
ebookcentral.proquest.com
Created from csuau on XXXXXXXXXX:03:49.
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The nature of morality
The nature
of morality
and ethics
Self
• Values
• Conscience
• Self-interest
Organisation
• Organisational
norms (formal
and informal)
• Rules, policies
and procedures
• Professional
codes
Theories based
on character
(virtue theory)
Aristotle's virtues
Moral agents develop
virtues and live a life
of excellence
Moral agents care for
those with whom they
are inter-related
Ethics of care
Egoism
Achieving the best long-term
outcome for
the moral agent
Achieving the best overall
good for the greatest number
of stakeholders
Utilitarianism
Theories based
on duty
(deontology)
Theories based
on consequences
(teleology)
Prioritising conflicting
interests by appealing to
hierarchy of principles
Universal law, acting with
good will, and treating others
as an end in themselves
Kant
Ross
Community
• Religion
• Law
• Etiquette
Making ethical decisions
3William, S., Vincent, B., Theodora, I., Shaw, W. H., & Muntean, D XXXXXXXXXXMoral issues in business. Retrieved from http:
ebookcentral.proquest.com
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CHAPTER 1
Seeing the moral
dimension of
usiness
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying this chapter, you should be able to:
1 define and understand ethics, including business and organisational ethics
2 understand the nature of morality
3 define and understand ethical relativism
4 understand the role of moral principles and individual responsibility in morality
and ethics
5 understand the elements that are essential for moral reasoning and ethical
decision making.
Sometimes the rich and mighty fall. Take Kenneth Lay, for example. Convicted by a US
jury in 2006 of conspiracy and multiple counts of fraud, he had been chairman and CEO
of Enron until the company took a nosedive and crashed. Founded in the 1980s, Enron
ecame a dominant player in the field of energy trading, growing rapidly to become
America’s seventh-biggest company. Wall Street loves growth, and Enron was its darling,
admired as dynamic, innovative and, of course, profitable. Enron stock exploded in value,
increasing in 1998 by 40 per cent. The next year it shot up 58 per cent, and the yea
4William, S., Vincent, B., Theodora, I., Shaw, W. H., & Muntean, D XXXXXXXXXXMoral issues in business. Retrieved from http:
ebookcentral.proquest.com
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after that an unbelievable 89 per cent. The fact that nobody could understand exactly
how the company made its money didn’t seem to matter.
After Fortune magazine voted Enron ‘America’s Most Innovative Company’ for six
consecutive years, Enron proudly took to calling itself not only ‘the world’s leading energy
company’ but also ‘the world’s leading company’. But when Enron was later forced to
declare bankruptcy – at the time the largest in US history – the world learnt that its
legendary financial prowess was illusory, and the company’s success was built on hype.
The hype continued to the end: Kenneth Lay was still recommending the company’s
stock to its employees at the same time as he and other executives were cashing in thei
shares and bailing out.
Enron’s crash cost the retirement accounts of its employees more than a billion
dollars as the company’s stock fell to only a few cents a share. Outside investors lost even
more. The reason Enron’s collapse caught investors by surprise – the company’s market
value was $28 billion just two months before its bankruptcy – was that Enron had always
made its financial records and accounts as opaque as possible. It did this by creating a
Byzantine financial structure of off-balance-sheet special-purpose entities – reportedly as
many as 9000 – that were supposed to be separate and independent from the main
company. Enron’s board of directors condoned these and other dubious accounting
practices and voted twice to permit executives to pursue personal interests that ran
contrary to those of the company. When Enron was obliged to redo its financial
statements for one three-year period, its profits dropped $600 million and its debts
increased $630 million.
Enron’s financial auditors should have spotted these and other problems. After all, the
shell game Enron was playing is an old one, and months before the company ran aground,
Enron Vice President She
on Watkins had warned Lay that the company could soon
‘implode in a wave of accounting scandals’. Yet both Arthur Andersen, Enron’s long-time
outside auditing firm, and Vinson & Elkins, the company’s law firm, had routinely put
together and signed off on various dubious financial deals, and in so doing made large
profits for themselves. Arthur Andersen, in particular, was supposed to make sure that
the company’s public records reflected financial reality, but Andersen was more wo
ied
about its auditing and consulting fees than about its fiduciary responsibilities. Even worse,
when the scandal began to
eak, a partner at Andersen organised the shredding of
incriminating Enron documents before investigators could lay their hands on them. As a
esult, the 89-year-old accounting firm was convicted of obstructing justice. The
Supreme Court later overturned that verdict on a technicality, but by then Arthu
Andersen had already been driven out of business. (The year before Enron went under,
the Securities and Exchange Commission fined Andersen $7 million for approving
misleading accounts at Waste Management, and it also had to pay $110 million to settle a
lawsuit for auditing work it did for Sunbeam before it, too, filed for bankruptcy. And
when massive accounting fraud was later uncovered at WorldCom it came out that the
company’s auditor was – you guessed it – Arthur Andersen.)
Enron’s fall also revealed the conflicts of interest that threaten the credibility of Wall
Street’s analysts – analysts who are compensated according to their ability to
ing in and
5
Chapter 1 Seeing the moral dimension of business
William, S., Vincent, B., Theodora, I., Shaw, W. H., & Muntean, D XXXXXXXXXXMoral issues in business. Retrieved from http:
ebookcentral.proquest.com
Created from csuau on XXXXXXXXXX:03:49.
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support investment banking deals. Enron was known in the industry as the ‘deal machine’
ecause it generated so much investment banking business – limited partnerships, loans
and derivatives. That may explain why, only days before Enron filed bankruptcy, just two
of the 16 Wall Street analysts who covered the company recommended that clients sell
the stock. The large banks with which Enron did business played a role, too, by helping
manufacture its fraudulent financial statements. (Subsequent lawsuits have forced them
to pay compensation. Citibank, for example, had to pay Enron’s victimised shareholders
$2 billion.) But the rot didn’t stop there. Enron and Andersen enjoyed extensive political
connections, which had helped over the years to ensure the passage of a
Answered Same Day Mar 16, 2020 MGT211 Charles Sturt University

Solution

Shikha answered on Mar 17 2020
138 Votes
Business Ethics        2
Business Ethics
Submitted By
Course
Professo
Date
Introduction
Professional ethics is defined as the act of professional ethics that are analyzed as the fundamental reason for overcoming the dilemmatic circumstances by making the created action in more effective way. The official acknowledgment of professional ethics is considered as the elaboration as well as appropriation of a good and expert lead code that forces regarding the moral tenets, being given endorses on account of their violation. This paper depends on the professional ethics idea. Inside it there have been dealt with the connection amongst morals as well as profound quality and the ideas of professionalism of expert morals and in addition the morals in public organization. (Vieriu, 2014).
Ethics & its Purpose in Business
Business ethics are defined as the rules that an organization use it while connecting with elements internally as well as externally to the organization. Main impact of ethical practices in an association can help to profit an organization’s financial position and also, they can enable an organization to get the components that are required to develop. It provides the association a positive notoriety in the organization’s vendors, customers etc. These standards can help to make strong business connections that can help to minimize item costs, provide business opportunities from clients. (George, 2017).
Regulating Professional Ethics
There are some principles that should oversee the conduct of staff members in a given profession. These principles are known as Ethic Codes. Infringement of these ethic codes may
ing about the dissatisfaction with one's expert associates and, in some cases, that results in loss of profession license from practice. Few times these codes remain unwritten and are a part of the normal comprehension of individuals from their profession –...
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