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Title: Theoretical Perspectives Database Weighting: 35% Length:2500 words Due:Week 9 Learning Outcome:1 Description: This assessment is designed to develop your ability to think about child...

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  • Title: Theoretical Perspectives Database

  • Weighting: 35%

  • Length:2500 words

  • Due:Week 9

  • Learning Outcome:1



Description:



This assessment is designed to develop your ability to think about child development through different theoretical perspectives and explore how different perspectives can and will inform your practice as an educator in an early childhood education service. You will have opportunities each week to consolidate your understanding of each developmental domain and the theory that informs an educator’s approach toward supporting and extending children’s development and learning within each developmental domain.



For this assessment, you will need to use class notes, textbook readings and articles to source information for your Theoretical Perspectives Database. You are to use the table provided (see below):



1. Select three (3) theorists whose perspectives are most relevant to each developmental domain.



  • A minimum of three (3) different theorists must be identified across both cognitive and language developmental domains for this assessment.

  • For each theorist, identify and summarise a minimum of 3 key points for each theoretical perspective. How does each theorist believe children develop within particular developmental domains?

  • The same theorists can include aspects across various developmental domains,however,ensure your key points are tailored to ensure relevance to each individual developmental domain.



i. For example, you can choose Lev Vygotsky to use as 1 (of 2) theorists for each of the 3 developmental domains, however, you must explain which parts of Vygotsky’s theoretical perspectives is relevant to each individual developmental domain (physical, emotional and social).




2. Implications for Practice:



  • For each theorist/theoretical perspective, provide a minimum two (2) implications for practice for each age range (0-2 years, 2-3 years, 3-5 years).

  • Reflecting on your chosen theorist and your Question 1 responses above, explain how each theoretical perspective can inform an educator’s practice with children of each age range in an early childhood service.



i. Think about how the theoretical perspective influences the teaching strategies an educator might use to support a child’s developmental abilities at each age bracket (0-2 years, 2-3 years, 3-5 years).



ii. Think about the similarities and differences between each theoretical perspective and how it influences your teaching strategies with children. This includes both the way you approach, interact and engage with children directly as well as considerations around the physical environment, as well as the materials and resources you might choose to provide.



  • As mentioned above, the same theorists can be identified across multiple developmental domains,however,ensure your key points are tailored to ensure relevance to each individual developmental domain.



i.For example, Vygotsky’s theory can be used to support children’s development across multiple domains. If you choose to identify Vygotsky as one of your theorists, you will identify the parts of Vygotsky’s theory that is most relevant to the domain. A further example, if you chose to identify Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) as one of Vygotsky’s key theoretical concepts, how could you apply this as an educator to support children’s language development? How could you apply ZPD as an educator to support social development?



  • Refer to the DEEWR (n.d.)document to guide your understanding of developmental skills typically demonstrated across various ages.

  • Refer to theBelonging, being & becoming: TheEarly Years Learning Framework for Australiadocument to guide your understanding of developmental outcomes and how educators can support children to develop these outcomes (Australian Government Department of Education and Training, for the Council of Australian Governments, 2009).



Refer to theDEEWR (n.d.) Developmental Milestonesdocument to guide your understanding of developmental skills typically demonstrated across various ages.



Refer to theBelonging, being & becoming: TheEarly Years Learning Framework for Australiadocument to guide your understanding of developmental outcomes and how educators can support children to develop these outcomes (Australian Government Department of Education and Training, for the Council of Australian Governments, 2009).



Readings:



Australian Government Department of Education and Training, for the Council of Australian Governments. (2009).Belonging, being & becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia.https://www.education.gov.au/child-care-package/resources/belonging-being-becoming-early-years-learning-framework-australia



Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (n.d.).Developmental milestones and the Early Years Learning Framework and the National Quality Standards.
https://www.acecqa.gov.au/sites/default/files/2018-02/DevelopmentalMilestonesEYLFandNQS.pdf































































Developmental Domain




Theorist







Summary of Key Concepts




Implications for Practice




Children 0-2 years




Implications for Practice




Children 2-3 years




Implications for Practice



Children 3-5 years





Language Development














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Emotional Development




















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Social Development




















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Extra note:



§
Make sure there is reference from the given books:


1.Theories into practice: understanding and rethinking our work with young children and the EYLF by Andrea Nolan and Bridie Raban


2.Early learning theories made visible by Mariam Beloglovsky and Lisa Daly




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Implications must relate to the theories of the theorists and implications must have details about how it can help in the certain field of development of a child.

Answered Same Day Apr 25, 2023

Solution

Banasree answered on Apr 25 2023
5 Votes
2
1.Ans.
Developmental Domains:
· Physical Development
    Theorist
    Theoretical Perspective
    Key Points
    Arnold Gesell
    Maturation Theory – Arnold Gesell, a formidable figure in the realm of child development, revolutionized the study of this field with his unique theory on maturation. His approach holds an influential status being one of earliest methods implemented and followed to date. As per Gesell's perspective, growth is an un
oken succession that is established by organic and hereditary factors, with a definite progression hinged on the child's gender and chronological age. Gesell opined that the growth of a child remains largely uninfluenced by external factors and comprehending it requires meticulous monitoring and documentation of their physical, emotional, as well as intellectual evolution over time. The groundwork advanced by Gesell's research, on the subject of child development, continues to have a lasting impact till present times. His concepts persist in shaping how we perceive and approach children's growth and progress today.
    1.Development is predetermined by biology and genetics.
2. Development follows a specific sequence.
3. Development is relatively unaffected by environmental factors.
    Jean Piaget
    Cognitive Development Theory - His work on cognitive development theory, which posits that development occurs in stages and that children construct their own knowledge through exploration and experimentation. Also, Piaget's theory of development is driven by the need for equili
ium between existing schemas and new experiences.
In other way, we can say that Piaget believed that as children grow and gain new experiences, they try to make sense of the world by fitting these experiences into their existing mental frameworks or schemas. As they encounter discrepancies between their schemas and new experiences, they adjust their schemas to better accommodate the new information. Piaget's theory has been influential in our understanding of cognitive development in children, and his ideas continue to shape educational practices today.
    1. Development occurs in stages. 2. Children construct their own knowledge through exploration and experimentation. 3. Development is driven by the need for equili
ium between existing schemas and new experiences.
    Lev Vygotsky
    Sociocultural Theory - One of Vygotsky's key ideas is that language plays a critical role in development. He indicates that as children engage in language, they internalize knowledge and are able to think abstractly. Such as, when a child asks a question about a concept they do not fully understand, an adult who has more knowledge about that concept can provide an explanation that helps the child to develop a deeper understanding of the concept. Another facts aspect of Vygotsky's theory is the concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD). This refers to the gap between what a child can do on their own and what they can do with the help of more knowledgeable others. Vygotsky believed that children are able to learn and develop more effectively when they are working within their ZPD, where they are challenged but not overwhelmed.
    1. Development is influenced by social interactions and cultural practices.
2. Children learn through interactions with more knowledgeable others.
3. Language plays a critical role in development, allowing children to internalize knowledge and think abstractly.
    · Developmental Domains: Language Development
    B.F. Skinne
    Behaviourist Theory – He was known for work on behaviorist theory, which focused on the role of enhance and imitation in language acquisition. According to his theory, children learn language through a process of trial and e
or, where they observe and copy others to determine the appropriate responses to different situations. This theory suggests that language development is largely a product of environmental factors, like the language and behavior of those around the child. Children learn language by receiving rewards and punishments for their speech and behavior, such as praise for co
ect responses or co
ections for inco
ect ones. This perspective on language development emphasizes the active role of the environment in moulding children's language abilities, and it has influenced the way we think about teaching and learning languages. It suggests that children are not passive learners, but rather active participants who actively seek out and shape their environment to suit their needs.
    1. Development is influenced by social interactions and cultural practices.
2. Children learn through interactions with more knowledgeable others.
3. Language plays a critical role in development, allowing children to internalize knowledge and think abstractly.
    Noam Chomsky
    Nativist Theory – It posits that language acquisition is innate and biologically determined. According to this theory, we possess an innate language acquisition device that allows us to learn language quickly and effortlessly. Chomsky's theory also suggests that children are born with an innate ability to learn language, and that this ability is unique to humans. He indicates that this innate ability allows children to acquire language quickly and with minimal input from adults, and that it enables them to produce complex and sophisticated language structures.
Chomsky's theory also emphasizes the role of innate cognitive...
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