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□ ‘Submitted’ entered in database (Staff initial ______ Date _________ XXXXXXXXXXViren: _________ ________    
     □ Results emailed to student (Staff initial ______ Date _______) □Results entered in database (Staff initial _____ Date _____)
□ Updated results emailed to student (Staff initial____ Date_____ □ Final results entered in database (Staff initial ____ Date___)
ASSESSMENT COVER SHEET
QUALIFICATION:     BSB80615 Graduate Diploma of Management (Learning)
Unit: BSBRES801 Initiate and lead applied research
Candidates: Submit this entire document
    CANDIDATE to complete this section
    Name:
    JUAN CAMILO GIRALDO
    Student ID:
    1796
    Email address:
     XXXXXXXXXX
    Trainer name:
    Catherine Gavigan
    Date submitted:
    
        Date resubmitted (1)
    Date resubmitted (2)
    IF ASSESSMENT TAKEN HOME BY STUDENT FOR CORRECTIONS:
I confirm that I am taking the marked assessment home to make co
ections. In case the assessment is misplaced or lost, I understand that it is my responsibility to resubmit the assessment again.
    Signature:
Date:
    Candidate declaration—By signing below, I declare that     no part of this assessment has been copied from another person’s work with the exception of where I have listed or referenced documents or work and that no part of this assessment has been written for me by another person. I understand and accept the assessment.
Signed: ___________________________      Date: __________________________
    ASSESSOR to complete this section
    
     XXXXXXXXXXRESULT IN EACH ASSESSMENT ITEM
    Comments
    
    Satisfactory
    Unsatisfactory
    Did not submit
    
    Assessment 1
    
    
    
    
    Assessment 2
    
    
    
    
    Assessment 3
    
    
    
    
    ASSESSOR to complete this section
    Name of assessor:
    
    Date portfolio review completed:
    
    
    Overall Results
    Competent
     Not Yet Competent
    Assessor signature
    
    
    
    
    
Oral testing (if applicable)
Assessors may ask the candidate oral questions to gather further supporting evidence, where written evidence is deemed to be incomplete or insufficient.
Comments:
    
    
ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS
1. You need to achieve a ‘Satisfactory’ grade in ALL the assessments items to be granted a ‘Competent’ grade in the unit.
1. In case you are not able to achieve a ‘Satisfactory’ grade in any assessment task, you will be given three (3) attempts to resubmit your assessment. Your trainer will be available to assist you in any areas of difficulty. Please discuss the assessment with your trainer to seek advice on how you can achieve competency in the unit.
1. Where relevant, oral questions may be asked to gather more information on your knowledge, skills and competence in the unit.
1. A holistic approach is used to assess your skills relevant to this qualification. The skills are assessed across the different units offered within this qualification. Where a skill relevant to this unit is not assessed within this assessment pack, please note that the skill will be assessed in another unit.
ASSESSMENT 1- THEORY AND RESEARCH
To complete this assessment you need to review:
· Study Guide: Topic 1 , 2, 3 and 4
This assessment has THREE parts
Answer the following questions by refe
ing to the research and applying your own ideas. You must reference the research using the Harvard referencing style.
Part A: Related to Topic 1
1. What do you understand by the term ‘applied research’?
2. What do you understand by the term ‘research context’?
3. Why is it important to frame a very clear and concise research question?
4. Explain the difference between qualitative and quantitative research
ACTION RESEARCH: Complete the following research task:
    Research task: Action research
    Access information about action research. Use the following websites or conduct your own search:
a. Action Learning, Action Research Association Inc., ‘Action research’, www.alara.net.au/aral/actionresearch>.
. Dick, B., ‘Action research and action learning’, www.aral.com.au
.
c. Wadsworth, Y., ‘Action Research International: Paper 2. What is participatory research?’, www.aral.com.au/ari/p-ywadsworth98.html>.
1. What is action research?
2. How does action research fit the action and the research together?
____________________________________________________
Review the various flowcharts that can be used to describe action research:
Google search:
a. www.google.com.au/search?q=action+research&hl=en&prmd=
imvnsb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=EIXFTu0jqJKJB9qV4IIO
&sqi=2&ved=0CFYQsAQ&biw=1363&bih=895>.
. Robertson, A., Major positions in research methods, uploaded 2007, YouTube video, www.youtube.com/watch?v=srRYdpVYD2A&feature=fvwrel>.
3. How does action research differ from conventional research?

4. What would you need to consider if you were to implement a research project in your workplace?
.
5. ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH: Complete the following task
    Research task: Ethnographic research guidelines
    Think about the following ethnographic research guidelines from TESOL Quarterly:
Assumptions
... Ethnography (and critical ethnography in particular) adopts a complex theoretical orientation toward culture. Culture — in collectives of differing magnitude, whether educational institutions, student communities, classrooms, or activity groups — is treated as heterogeneous, conflictual, negotiated, and evolving, as distinct from unified, cohesive, fixed, and static ...
Data
Show evidence of residing or spending considerable lengths of time interacting with people in the study setting, observing and recording their activities as they unfolded through means such as field notes (see, e.g., Emerson, Fretz, & Shaw, 1995), audio and video recordings, or both. A hallmark of ethnography is extended, firsthand participant observation and interactions with participants in the study setting.
Record participant beliefs and attitudes through such typical means as notes or transcribed recordings of informal conversation and interviews, and participant journals (see Salzman, 2001).
Include several different sources of data. Besides participant observation and interactions with participants, these sources might include life histories (Darnell, 2001) and na
ative analysis (Cortazzi, 2001), photography, audio or video recordings (Nastasi, 1999), written documents (Brewer, 2000), data documenting historical trends, and questionnaires and surveys (Salzman, 2001).
If called for, as they often are in critical ethnography (as well as in many cases of descriptive/interpretive ethnography), use additional sources of data and reflection. These include:
evidence of how the power differences between you and the informants/subjects were negotiated. Though it is idealistic to think that power differences can be totally eliminated, address how they were managed, modified, or shifted and how they influenced the data gathered.
your attitudes and biases toward the community and its culture. Record how your perspectives changed during the course of the research and how these changes shaped the data gathered.
    the impact of your activities and behavior on the community. State whether you involved yourself in the ethical, social, or political challenges faced by the community. Include in the data the way such practical engagements may have generated deeper insights or affected the research (and the ways you negotiated these tensions).
the conflicts and inconsistencies in the statements made by the informants (or community insiders). Rather than favoring one set of data over the other or neatly tying all the loose strands to a
ive at generalizations, wrestle with the diversity of insider perspectives in order to represent culture with complexity.
a
oadened understanding of the context of the culture. Although context is being constantly (re)created through talk even as the informants interact with the researcher, reflect in the data the way larger forces outside the community shape culture. Study how social institutions and political agencies affect the local culture, and, similarly, seek historical data on the status of the culture before and after the research.
Because ethnographic analytical procedures vary by researchers’ schools of thought, you may incorporate quantitative as well as qualitative procedures and instruments if appropriate (see, e.g., Bernard, 2002).
(Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc (TESOL), ‘TESOL Quarterly research guidelines: Qualitative research: (Critical) ethnography guidelines’, www.tesol.org/s_tesol/sec_document.asp?CID=476&DID=
2157>.)
1. What are some of the possible ba
iers to conducting effective ethnographic research in your specific workplace context?
6. Explain the meaning of ‘validity’ in quantitative and qualitative research
7. Why is it important to maintain privacy when conducting research?
8. What are the benefits of a code of conduct for research?
Part B: Related to Topic 2
9. Why is it important to conduct a literature review prior to conducting research?
10. RESEARCH METHODS AND DATA COLLECTION: Complete the table below by listing the advantages of each research technique
    Technique
    Restrictions
    Advantanges
    Questionnaires and surveys    
    Some types of have low response rates but are more easily collated than interview data.
Questions need to be worded carefully to avoid confusion and misunderstanding.
    
    Case studies
    Case studies can be difficult to generalise or make comparisons from.
    
    Focus groups
    Difficult to ensure consistency if a number of researchers are involved.
Difficult to record accurately — a skilled exercise.
Participants may develop ‘group think’.
    
    Interviews
    Time consuming.
Difficult to record and transcribe.
    
    Observation
    Time consuming.
If more than one researcher is involved, difficult to ensure consistency.
    
    Statistical data
    Often difficult to interpret.
May require expert handling and analysis.
    
Part C: Related to Topic 3 and 4
11. What is ‘triangulation’?
12. What are some of the factors you need to consider when presenting a research report?
ASSESSMENT 2- Analysing Research Reports
You have been given copies of two research reports. Read the reports. Select ONE of the following reports and analyse the use of research techniques and answer the questions below
· REPORT 1: Barton, D., Appleby, R., Hodge, R., Tusting, K., and Ivanic, R., 2006, Relating adults lives and learning: participation and engagement in different settings, National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NRDC), London, viewed April 2012, www.nrdc.org.uk/publications_details.asp?ID=48>.
OR
· REPORT 2: Leith, M., 2012, How learning English facilitates integration for adult migrants: the Ja
ah Language Centre experience, NCVER, viewed April 2012, www.ncver.edu.au/publications/2461.html>.
REPORT ANALYSIS
1. Which report have you selected for this assessment? Tick any ONE below
Report 1
Report 2
Fundamentals: Purpose, audience, question
1. What is the purpose and genesis of the report. What motivated the research? Why was it done?
7. What is the question, problem or hypothesis?
8. What is the intended and potential audience?
9. How is the research relevant to the organisation or audience — how might LLN practitioners and
Answered Same Day Mar 22, 2020 BSBRES801

Solution

Shashank answered on Mar 30 2020
144 Votes
□ ‘Submitted’ entered in database (Staff initial ______ Date _________) Viren: _________ ________    
     □ Results emailed to student (Staff initial ______ Date _______) □Results entered in database (Staff initial _____ Date _____)
□ Updated results emailed to student (Staff initial____ Date_____ □ Final results entered in database (Staff initial ____ Date___)
ASSESSMENT COVER SHEET
QUALIFICATION:     BSB80615 Graduate Diploma of Management (Learning)
Unit: BSBRES801 Initiate and lead applied research
Candidates: Submit this entire document
    CANDIDATE to complete this section
    Name:
    JUAN CAMILO GIRALDO
    Student ID:
    1796
    Email address:
    [email protected]
    Trainer name:
    Catherine Gavigan
    Date submitted:
    
        Date resubmitted (1)
    Date resubmitted (2)
    IF ASSESSMENT TAKEN HOME BY STUDENT FOR CORRECTIONS:
I confirm that I am taking the marked assessment home to make co
ections. In case the assessment is misplaced or lost, I understand that it is my responsibility to resubmit the assessment again.
    Signature:
Date:
    Candidate declaration—By signing below, I declare that     no part of this assessment has been copied from another person’s work with the exception of where I have listed or referenced documents or work and that no part of this assessment has been written for me by another person. I understand and accept the assessment.
Signed: ___________________________      Date: __________________________
    ASSESSOR to complete this section
    
     RESULT IN EACH ASSESSMENT ITEM
    Comments
    
    Satisfactory
    Unsatisfactory
    Did not submit
    
    Assessment 1
    
    
    
    
    Assessment 2
    
    
    
    
    Assessment 3
    
    
    
    
    ASSESSOR to complete this section
    Name of assessor:
    
    Date portfolio review completed:
    
    
    Overall Results
    Competent
     Not Yet Competent
    Assessor signature
    
    
    
    
    
Oral testing (if applicable)
Assessors may ask the candidate oral questions to gather further supporting evidence, where written evidence is deemed to be incomplete or insufficient.
Comments:
    
    
ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS
1. You need to achieve a ‘Satisfactory’ grade in ALL the assessments items to be granted a ‘Competent’ grade in the unit.
1. In case you are not able to achieve a ‘Satisfactory’ grade in any assessment task, you will be given three (3) attempts to resubmit your assessment. Your trainer will be available to assist you in any areas of difficulty. Please discuss the assessment with your trainer to seek advice on how you can achieve competency in the unit.
1. Where relevant, oral questions may be asked to gather more information on your knowledge, skills and competence in the unit.
1. A holistic approach is used to assess your skills relevant to this qualification. The skills are assessed across the different units offered within this qualification. Where a skill relevant to this unit is not assessed within this assessment pack, please note that the skill will be assessed in another unit.
ASSESSMENT 1- THEORY AND RESEARCH
· To complete this assessment you need to review: Study Guide: Topic 1, 2, 3 and 4
This assessment has THREE parts: 3490 + 3000 = 6490
Answer the following questions by refe
ing to the research and applying your own ideas. You must reference the research using the Harvard referencing style.
Part A: Related to Topic 1
1. What do you understand by the term ‘applied research’?
This is a kind of research where the objective is to find a solution of immediate problem that exist in a society, organization. Generally, it is used where addressal of problem is required.
2. What do you understand by the term ‘research context’?
Research Context helps readers to understand what they might not be able to comprehend. It is helpful for readers in making sense to terminologies and information which may not be available globally.
3. Why is it important to frame a very clear and concise research question?
Research question acts as a catalyst for the research that is being conducted. It helps in focussing on the initiating point of research. If not made clear and concise then the research might digress to the unwanted direction and give unexpected results.
4. Explain the difference between qualitative and quantitative research
Qualitative research helps in developing an understanding on aspects like the way human think and feel. It works as a method of inquiry to understand human nature and social science. Nature of research is holistic while approach that is used for research is subjective. This research is done with the objective of exploring ideas and discover them which are used in the process. The methods used to conduct this kind of research are in-depth interviews, focus group discussions etc. The outcome of this research is such that it develops an initial understanding about the subject.
Quantitative Research is a method that is used to generate numeric data and concrete facts. The process is done using quantitative techniques like statistical analysis, logical and math technique. Here the approach is particularistic with an objective approach. The type of research is conclusive instead of exploratory. Numeric data is the basic element which is used for getting results out of the research conducted. The objective is to examine the cause and effect relationship between variables. The methods adopted for this kind of research are more structured like surveys, questionnaires etc. The final outcome of the research helps in recommending the final course of action.
ACTION RESEARCH: Complete the following research task:
    Research task: Action research
    Access information about action research. Use the following websites or conduct your own search:
a. Action Learning, Action Research Association Inc., ‘Action research’, www.alara.net.au/aral/actionresearch>.
. Dick, B., ‘Action research and action learning’, www.aral.com.au
.
c. Wadsworth, Y., ‘Action Research International: Paper 2. What is participatory research?’, www.aral.com.au/ari/p-ywadsworth98.html>.
1. What is action research?
It is a spiral process which allows flexibility of allowing action and research to be achieved in the same time frame. Action here refers to change and improvement while research here refers to understanding and knowledge.
2. How does action research fit the action and the research together?
Since action research is a spiral process, alternating between action and research in a tight cycle fit them together. The cycle comprises of action and critical reflection.
____________________________________________________
Review the various flowcharts that can be used to describe action research:
Google search:
a. www.google.com.au/search?q=action+research&hl=en&prmd=
imvnsb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=EIXFTu0jqJKJB9qV4IIO
&sqi=2&ved=0CFYQsAQ&biw=1363&bih=895>.
. Robertson, A., Major positions in research methods, uploaded 2007, YouTube video, www.youtube.com/watch?v=srRYdpVYD2A&feature=fvwrel>.
3. How does action research differ from conventional research?
Action research is embedded activity instead of an add-on activity. A complete cycle is made by formulation of questions which are relevant to the research. As a result, changes can be made in the practice of research. While the purpose of conventional research is to draw conclusions action research works on making decisions. Conventional research focus on advancing knowledge in the field while improving educational practice is primary agenda for action research. Data analysis is done by using rigorous statistical methods in conventional while focus is given on practical instead of stats for action research. (Mc Millan and Wergin.1998).

4. What would you need to consider if you were to implement a research project in your workplace?
Things that need to be kept in mind while implementation of research project in workplace are as follows:
a. Separate line should be drawn between your role in workplace and role as a researcher.
. Permission should be taken for accessing potential participant through the host organization.
c. Ethical guidelines should be taken care properly and one should abide by them.
d. For participants taking part in research explicit instruction should be given to them in advance in order to avoid any conflicting situation. They should be told that there is no pressure to participate in research and is totally on their will.
https:
www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation
esearch/support/ethics/storeddocs/4TrainingAdvice/ 4Researchintheworkplace/ResearchintheWorkplaceguidance.pdf
5. ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH: Complete the following task
    Research task: Ethnographic research guidelines
    Think about the following ethnographic research guidelines from TESOL Quarterly:
Assumptions
... Ethnography (and critical ethnography in particular) adopts a complex theoretical orientation toward culture. Culture — in collectives of differing magnitude, whether educational institutions, student communities, classrooms, or activity groups — is treated as heterogeneous, conflictual, negotiated, and evolving, as distinct from unified, cohesive, fixed, and static ...
Data
Show evidence of residing or spending considerable lengths of time interacting with people in the study setting, observing and recording their activities as they unfolded through means such as field notes (see, e.g., Emerson, Fretz, & Shaw, 1995), audio and video recordings, or both. A hallmark of ethnography is extended, firsthand participant observation and interactions with participants in the study setting.
Record participant beliefs and attitudes through such typical means as notes or transcribed recordings of informal conversation and interviews, and participant journals (see Salzman, 2001).
Include several different sources of data. Besides participant observation and interactions with participants, these sources might include life histories (Darnell, 2001) and na
ative analysis (Cortazzi, 2001), photography, audio or video recordings (Nastasi, 1999), written documents (Brewer, 2000), data documenting historical trends, and questionnaires and surveys (Salzman, 2001).
If called for, as they often are in critical ethnography (as well as in many cases of descriptive/interpretive ethnography), use additional sources of data and reflection. These include:
evidence of how the power differences between you and the informants/subjects were negotiated. Though it is idealistic to think that power differences can be totally eliminated, address how they were managed, modified, or shifted and how they influenced the data gathered.
your attitudes and biases toward the community and its culture. Record how your perspectives changed during the course of the research and how these changes shaped the data gathered.
    the impact of your activities and behavior on the community. State whether you involved yourself in the ethical, social, or political challenges faced by the community. Include in the data the way such practical engagements may have generated deeper insights or affected the research (and the ways you negotiated these tensions).
the conflicts and inconsistencies in the statements made by the informants (or community insiders). Rather than favoring one set of data over the other or neatly tying all the loose strands to a
ive at generalizations, wrestle with the diversity of insider perspectives in order to represent culture with complexity.
a
oadened understanding of the context of the culture. Although context is being constantly (re)created through talk even as the informants interact with the researcher, reflect in the data the way larger forces outside the community shape culture. Study how social institutions and political agencies affect the local culture, and, similarly, seek historical data on the status of the culture before and after the research.
Because ethnographic analytical procedures vary by researchers’ schools of thought, you may incorporate quantitative as well as qualitative procedures and instruments if appropriate (see, e.g., Bernard, 2002).
(Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc (TESOL), ‘TESOL Quarterly research guidelines: Qualitative research: (Critical) ethnography guidelines’, www.tesol.org/s_tesol/sec_document.asp?CID=476&DID=
2157>.)
1. What are some of the possible ba
iers to conducting effective ethnographic research in your specific workplace context?
Conducting research with vulnerable groups leads to various ethical challenges like confidentiality of data collected and assurance of ethics are kept throughout the study is conducted. While conducting research practical ba
iers that are generally faced by researchers are building a rapport with the research participant. While interviewing or conducting discussions it is very important that researcher control his/her emotions or distress on topics that is also sensitive to them.
It is important to keep a professional relationship with all the participants in order to reduce bias during the research. This generally happens when researcher is well acquainted, and bias comes due to old relationship...
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