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Qiiiihiy E'lginecrinM. 18:299- ?23, 2006 Copyright r Taylor & FrariL'is Group. LLC ISSN: 0S98-2I12 print/ XXXXXXXXXXonline DOI: It).1080/ XXXXXXXXXX Taylor & Francis Ia/lor(.franci5 Croup Designing...

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Qiiiihiy E'lginecrinM. 18:299- ?23, 2006
Copyright r Taylor & FrariL'is Group. LLC
ISSN: 0S98-2I12 print/ XXXXXXXXXXonline
DOI: It).1080/ XXXXXXXXXX
Taylor & Francis
Ia/lor(.franci5 Croup
Designing New Housing at the University of Miami: A "Six Sigma"®
DMADV/DFSS Case Study
J.A. Johnson and H. Gitlow
Department of Munagcment Science. School of Business Administration, University of Miami, Coral Gahles, FL
S. Widene
Department of Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering University of Miami, Coral Gables. FL
E. Popovich
Sterling Enterprises International, Inc., Boca Raton, FL
The "Six Sigma" management DMADV model is used in this
paper to design a new dormitory concept at the University of
Miami. It is intended to provide a roadmap for conducting a
Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) project.
Keywords Case study: Design for Six Sigma; DFSS;
DMADV; Six Sigma.
INTRODUCTION
"Six Sigma" management is the relentless and rig-
orous pursuit ofthe reduction of variation in all critical
processes in an organization. Us purpose is to achieve
continuous and
eakthrough improvements that
impact the bottom line and increase customer satisfac-
tion. Six Sigma management is an organizational initia-
tive designed to create processes that produee no more
than 3.4 defeets per million opportunities.
The two methods employed in Six Sigma initia-
tives to achieve this high standard of quality are called
the DMAIC (the Defme-Measure-Analyze-Improve-
Control) method (Rasis et al.. 2002; vol. 15 no. 1
pp XXXXXXXXXX), and the DMADV (Detme-Measure-
Analyze-Design-Verify) method. The DMAIC method
is used primarily for improvement of an existing
' "Six Sigma" is a registered trademark of the Motorola
Corporation.
Address co
espondence to Howard Gitlow, Professor of
Management Science, School of Business Administration,
University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA. E-mail;
XXXXXXXXXX
product, service, or process, while the DMADV
method is used primarily for the invention and innova-
tion of modified or new products, services, or pro-
cesses. This paper focuses on the DMADV method.
DEFINE PHASE
Introduction
The Define Phase of the DMADV model has five
eomponents: establish the background and business
case; assess the risks, benefits, and costs of the project;
form the product development team; develop the
project plan, and write the project charter.
Background and Business Case
The University of Miami has experienced rapid
growth in student enrollment, a policy that stipulates
that all ineoming freshmen must live on campus (unless
they live with their family), and the wish of the presi-
dent for a more residential campus created more
demand than supply for on-campus housing. This is
clearly seen by the portion of the University's mission
and dashboard, shown in Table I.
A partial hst of potential projects is shown in the
ight-most column of Table 1. The potential projects
are prioritized for action in a project prioritization
matrix (see Tabie 2).
The project relating to the School of Business
Administration with the highest weighted average from
Table 2 is selected as a ''Six Sigma" project, as it has
the most impact on the business objectives, in this case,
299
300 J.A. Johnson et al.
Tahle I
The mission and selected portions of the dashboard for the University of Miami. "Mission Statement: The University of
Miami exists that human knowledge be treasured, preserved, expanded and disseminated and that the human mind, body and
spirit be nurtured and strengthened through learning." Coiiivni Las! Modified on March XXXXXXXXXX
President
Key objectives
Improve student
experiences
Improve the
national
anking
ofthe
university
Improve
inlerdisciplina
esearch
Increase the
university
endowment
Key indicators
Number of
students
applying
Percent of
students
eturning
y semeste
1-MR chart
of national
anking
Number of
interdisciplinary
projects
Total value of
the endowment
y yea
Provost
Key objectives
Increase the
number of
Key indicators
Number of
students
students living living
on campus
Increase
student
esident
etention
ate
on campus
y semeste
Percentage
of students
etained
each semeste
Dean ofthe school of business
Key objectives
Increase the
number of
usiness
students
living on
campus
Increase
usiness
student
etention
Key indicators
Number of
usiness
students
living
on campus
y semeste
Percentage of
usiness
students
etained by
semeste
Projects
Create more
on-campus
housing fo
usiness
students
(new housing)
Improve on-
campus housing
options fo
usiness
students
(housing
enovation)
Improve on-
campus housing
options fo
usiness
students
(housing
enovation)
Improve on-
campus housing
options fo
usiness
students
(housing
enovation)
Improve on-
campus housing
options fo
usiness
students
(housing
enovation)
Tabh' 2
Six Sigma project prioritization matrix
Partial list of potential projects for business school
Weight Office wing New housing Housing renovations Business li
ary
President s business objectives
Improve national ranking
Improve interdisciplinary
esearch
Increase the endowment
Improve student experience
Weighted average
0.4U
0.30
0.15
0.15
1.00
9
9
I
3
6.9
3
1
9
9
4,2
1
3
1
3
1.9
Designing New Housing at tho L'niversity of Miami 301
the Office Wing Construction, vî ith a score of 6.9.
However, this project is near completion, so the Dean
of the School of Business can start to set up the next
project. New Housing Construction.
Risks. Benefits, and Costs of the Project
Risks
Table 3 shows a failure modes and effects analysis
(FMEA) for the new housing project that was created
in a
ainstorming session by team members. Each
individual item was rated by (1) severity, (2) probabil-
ity of occu
ence, and (3) detectability, on a 1 to 10
scale. In each case, the scale is established so that 1
is the ideal state, that is, cheapest or least damaging,
least likely to occur, and easiest to detect. Accordingly,
a 10 is the most undesirable state, that is, expensive o
heavily damaging, likely to occur, and difficult to
detect. The three scores for each failure mode are
multiplied to get a composite score ofthe risk, known
as the Risk Priority Number (RPN). An RPN can
ange from 1 ( 1 x 1 x 1 ) to XXXXXXXXXXx 10 x 10), with
higher numbers being more problematic risks.
In the dormitory case, team members established a
plan to decrease risk. After the plan is put into place,
the three component scores arc estimated again to
compute a revised RPN,
The two major risks, obsolescence (RPN =560)
and design team dynamics (RPN XXXXXXXXXXcan be
avoided by planning flexible interiors that can be easily
updated (revised RPN = 2!0) and maintaining a team
environment (revised RPN = 192). respectively.
Benefits
The measurable benefits of new housing construc-
tion can be
oken down into two groups, financial
and non-financia! benefits. Financial benefits include
ental of the new rooms. However, the dormitory is
planned to be a
eak-even operation (see Table 4).
Non-financial benefits would also be realized, fo
example, in potentially increased ratings from sources
like Bu.siness Week and U.S. News and World Report.
Another example is the positive feelings evoked from
a physically apparent sign of growth, as the new build-
ing stimulates interest and excitement.
Composition of the Team
The team comprised two members (Adam Johnson
and Scott Widener). one advisor (Dr, Edward
Popovich). one Black Belt (Professor Howard Gitlow),
and one Champion (Dean Paul Sugrue).
Project Plan
The fourth step in the Define Phase is to develop a
project plan which has five components: opportunity
statement, project objective, project scope, multi-
generational product plan, and a Gantt chart. The
purpose of the project plan is to define the project.
Opportunity Statement
The opportunity statement clarifies the opportu-
nity the project provides toward bottom-line profits
or customer satisfaction. It asks: "What is the pain
that will be addressed by the project?'"
In the dormitory example, the University of Miami
president stated her desire to create a more residential
campus (see the dashboard in Table 1). The Dean of
the School of Business would like to establish the
School of Business as a top 50 business school. Cur-
ently, there is a need to expand the facility and infra-
structure to keep up with the escalating competition to
ecome a top 50 business school.
Project Objectives
The project objective clarifies the goal of the pro-
ject. In the case of the dormitory example, the project
objective is to create a design for a high-class living
facility that encourages learning and community aimed
at executives-in-residence. MBA students, and junio
and senior undergraduate business students. The facil-
ity should increase the number of on-campus residents.
Project Scope
The project scope focuses the opportunity state-
ment by considering the constraints on the project.
The first issue considered by the project scope is
esource constraints. Eor the dormitory project, the
only constraints are a deadline for completing the
design and a particular plot of land. The second issue
considered by the project scope is obstacles, Eor the
dormitory project, obstacles include confidentiality
about the project, political struggles between key
groups with vested interests, and an extremely diverse
population that needs to be appeased with any newly
designed facilities. The third issue considered by the
project scope is financial constraints. Einancial
constraints for the project are set by the construction
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Designing New Housing at the University of Miami 303
Tahle 4
Finaneial estimates by yea
Revenues by floo
Single room rent per student
40 single rentals floo
Total rent per floo
Debt service by floo
25.137 square feet per tloo
S200 per square foot construction costs
Construction cost per iloor ($5,027,400)
30-year bond (ii $"
, interest rale
Net
Answered Same Day Jul 01, 2020

Solution

Amar answered on Jul 03 2020
115 Votes
Running Header: DMADV Approach – Designing New Product / Services             1
DMADV Approach – Designing New Product / Services     4
DMADV Approach – Designing New Product / Services
DMADV Approach – Designing New Product / Services
Various methodologies based on Six Sigma are used with an intention for reducing e
ors within the product line in the manner of considering all of the various processes that contributes towards overall completion as well as delivery concerning the items / services (Jaswal et al., 2017; Pendokhare & Quazi, 2015). The improvement of the overall effectiveness concerning the said processes as well as the omission concerning redundancies refer the ways for making the complete processes of manufacturing to become highly efficient (Jaswal et al., 2017; Pendokhare & Quazi, 2015). The same results in the shortening of the lead time, enhancement concerning gross margin as well as highly reliable forms of the production lines (Jaswal et al., 2017; Pendokhare & Quazi, 2015). The coupling of improvements within the processes of manufacturing to that of governance concerning customer service could aid in the delivery concerning highly complete / beneficial products / services. One such methodology...
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