Great Deal! Get Instant $10 FREE in Account on First Order + 10% Cashback on Every Order Order Now

1.011 Project Example, Sydney Opera House P RO J E C T E VA LUA T I ON Prepared for: 1.011 FINAL TERM PROJECT Prepared by: MIT Students Date: SPRING 2011 Acknowledgements:...

1 answer below »
1.011 Project Example, Sydney Opera House
P RO J E C T   E VA LUA T I ON  
Prepared for:    1.011 FINAL TERM PROJECT 
Prepared by:     MIT Students 
Date:    SPRING 2011 
Acknowledgements:  SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
    PROFESSOR JOSEPH SUSSMAN (MIT DEPT. OF CIVIL ENGINEERING) 
    NIHIT JAIN (MIT DEPT. OF CIVIL ENGINEERING) 
 

Image courtesy of Kevin Gi
ons on Flickr.
http:
www.flickr.com/photos/kevgi
o/ XXXXXXXXXX
  2
 
Table of Contents 
BACKGROUND  3
THE STAKEHOLDERS  4
STAKEHOLDERS DURING THE INITIAL CONSTRUCTION PERIOD  5 
PRESENT DAY STAKEHOLDERS  7 
MAJOR ISSUES THAT AFFECTED THE PROJECT  8
COSTS AND BENEFITS  9
INITIAL ANALYSIS  9 
LOTTERIES USED FOR FINANCING  9 
SIGNIFICANT DECISIONS THAT AFFECTED DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION  11
THE FOUR SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE DESIGN AFTER UTZON LEFT:  13 
STATUS OF THE PROJECT  14
OUR ANALYSIS OF THE RELEVANT COSTS AND BENEFITS  15
A   15 
NALYSIS 
NALYSIS OF INITIAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS: 
A O 19 
 
OF  PERATIONAL PERIOD (1973­2010): 
REVENUE 20 
EXPENDITURE  21 
NET CASH FLOWS  22 
CRITIQUE OF THE PROJECT AND PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESS  23
WAS IT A PROFITABLE VENTURE?  23 
 
IS IT FINANCIALLY SUSTAINABLE FOR THE FUTURE?  24
HOW WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO QUANTIFY ITS VALUE TO THE PEOPLE OF NEW SOUTH WALES?  23
 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: WHAT DOES THE AUS $ 800 MILLION TOTAL REFURBISHMENT RECOMMENDED IN 
010 REALLY MEAN?  242  
ITIQUE OF THE PROJECT AND CONCLUSIONS FROM OUR PROJECT  CR PR
FROM THIS PROJECT, AND THE MISTAKES MADE THEREIN, WE LEARN:  25 
WE LEARN THE IMPORTANCE OF PLANNING WELL BEFORE IMPLEMENTING A PROJECT. COMPLETE DESIGNS WOULD HAVE 
SAVED THIS PROJECT A GREAT AMOUNT OF MONEY AND TIME.  25
 EVALUATION  OCESS  25
 
COMMENTS ON THE PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESS  26 
APPENDIX  27
GENERAL FORMULAS  27 
EXPENDITURE FROM OPERATIONAL PERIOD  29
REVENUE FROM OPERATIONAL PERIOD  28 
 
NET CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATIONAL PERIOD  30 
BIBLIOGRAPHY  31
  3
 
NOTE: All amounts given are in actual dollars 
B
 
ACKGROUNDi, ,ii iii
On November 11, 1954 the honorable John Joseph Cahill, the Premier of New South 
Wales at the time, convened a conference to discuss the establishment of an opera house in 
New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.  At the conference, Cahill expressed his desire for 
“proper facilities for the expression of talent and the staging of the highest forms of 
entertainment…that will be a credit to the State not only today but for hundreds of years.”  
Out of the 21 possible sites of the proposed opera house, Bennelong Point, a peninsula of 
2.23 hectares (240000 ft2) was chosen on May 17, 1955.  The tram shed, which was located 
there, was removed: a change welcomed by the Opera House Committee and the residents 
of Sydney. 
  On Fe
uary 1, 1956, the international competition for the national opera house was 
commenced.  The competition, a
anged by Premier Cahill and the government of New 
South Wales, provided competitors with a 25‐page booklet with black and white photos of 
Bennelong Point.  Detailed in the booklet were the requirements for the opera house 
including a large hall for symphony concerts, large‐scale opera, ballet and dance, choral, 
pageants, and mass meetings that could seat 3000‐3500 people and a small hall for 
dramatic presentations, intimate opera, chamber music, concerts, recitals, and lectures that 
could seat 1200.  The structure also required a restaurant with a capacity of 250 and two 
meeting rooms, one for 100 people and one for 200 people.  The competition closed in late 
1956 with 233 entries representing 28 countries, including Australia, England, Germany, 
French Morocco, Iran, and Kenya. 
  In early January of 1957, 38‐year old Danish architect, Jørn Utzon, was announced as 
the winner of the competition by Cahill at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.  Utzon had 
designed the opera house without first having seen the site in person and he relied on 
photographs, shipping maps, and firsthand accounts.  The judges chose Utzon’s design 
ased on its pure originality and creativity, realizing that it would “clearly be a 
  4
controversial design.”  However, they were still convinced of its merits to New South Wales 
and Sydney.  The original drawing featured Utzon’s structurally unrealizable, but 
aesthetically pleasing roof design. 
  On July 19, 1957, the Sydney Opera House Lottery Fund was established.  As it 
would turn out, the lotteriesiv would pay for the majority of the initial construction cost, as 
the government of New South Wales did not want to pay for the project.   
  With Utzon’s approval, Ove Arup and Partners was appointed as the structural 
engineers for the project in 1958 and construction of the Sydney Opera House began in 
1959.  It was expected to take four years to complete with an estimated cost of AUS $7 M.  
However, even working together with Arup, Utzon did not come up with the final spherical 
design of the roof until sometime between 1961 and 1962; three to four years after 
construction began.   
  The Sydney Opera House would be one of the first major projects designed using 
computer‐aided design (CAD)v and presented major revolutionary architectural concepts 
and engineering challenges. It was also one of the first major projects, which employed the 
use of computers to analyze internal load effects on the members that would support the 
oof structurevi.  
Altogether, the Sydney Opera House took fourteen years to complete and 
construction costs amounted to nearly AUS $102 M (actual dollars).  Since its initial 
opening in 1973, the Sydney Opera House has undergone numerous renovations and 
expansions and hosted many performances. 
THE STAKEHOLDERSvii
A project the magnitude of the Sydney Opera House, a public sector endeavor, had 
many stakeholders.  The following analysis of the stakeholders classifies them using the 
Mitchell criteria, which determines and places stakeholders on the basis of whether or not 
they possess any combination of the three following qualities: power, legitimacy, and 
urgency.  In addition to this, the stakeholders will be evaluated within two different 
timeframes: during the construction of the Sydney Opera House (1959‐1973) and the 
modern day era. 
Minjung Lee
Minjung Lee
Minjung Lee
Stakeholders during the initial construction period 
  When the Sydney Opera House Project first started to take form in the mid 20th 
century, the government of New South Wales (NSW) was given a task to create a theater, 
which was intended to serve the arts.  This makes the NSW government the very first 
stakeholder of the project.  From the Mitchell perspective, the government was probably a 
definitive stakeholder, exhibiting power, legitimacy, and urgency, since they were given the 
esponsibility to facilitate the creation of such a project. 
Chronologically, the next stakeholders are the judging panel of the international 
competition to design the future opera house.  These stakeholders can be classified as 
dependent, because they were appointed by the government of New South Wales to choose 
a design for the opera house; however, they lacked the power to do anything further once 
the design was chosen. 
  The main stakeholder throughout the initial construction process (1959‐1973) was 
Jørn Utzon, whose design was chosen out of a total of 233 entries.  Since the project lacked 
a proper manager, Utzon, along with Ove Arup, the chief structural engineer working on the 
project, facilitated and oversaw the construction of the project.  Together, they worked for 
four years before a
iving at the final design for the roof.  This keen sense of architectural 
vision caused some problems, as Utzon would pay more attention to the design aspect of 
the structure rather than the time and cost objectives.  However, because he was 
essentially the project manager, nearly everything he said went through, which classifies 
him as a definitive stakeholder under the Mitchell framework.  Arup, who was for the most 
part Utzon’s second in command, is also considered a definitive stakeholder. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This image has been removed
due to copyright restrictions.
Figure 1: Utzon working on a model of the Opera Houseviii
  5
Minjung Lee
  6
  In 1966, due to financial issues, Jørn Utzon resigned from the project before its 
completion, and the government eventually hired Hall, Todd, and Littlemore.  Utzon left 
with some of the original blueprints of the building, so Hall, Todd, and Littlemore had to 
spend time and money on additional designsix.  This makes the Hall, Todd and Littlemore 
definitive stakeholders, because after Utzon left, they essentially assumed the roles of 
project manager. 
In 1967, at the request of the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC), the New 
South Wales government changed the proposed larger opera hall into the concert hall 
ecause symphony concerts, which were managed by ABC, were predicted to be more 
popular and able of drawing larger audiences than opera.  Thus, the revenues to the opera 
house would increase.  The Australian Broadcasting Commission, at this point in time, was 
a dependent stakeholder, because they had legitimate and urgent concerns for a concert 
hall, but they had to rely on the NSW government to do their bidding.  
  The funding for the Sydney Opera House was done primarily through lotteries, 
which had participants who were most likely poor, as we will discuss in a later part of the 
project.  Without the lottery contestants, there would have been insufficient funding for the 
opera house.  However, besides funding this endeavor, these contestants really had no 
power.  These stakeholders also did not exhibit legitimacy or urgency; the contestants 
participated in the lotteries with their own benefits in mind.  It can therefore be argued 
that they did not quite have any interest in the Opera House and only sought to win the 
jackpot, thus, they have none of the three qualities detailed by Mitchell so they are 
classified as non‐stakeholders.  However, this term could be a little misleading, because 
without their funding from the lotteries, it is doubtful whether or not the Sydney Opera 
House would be around today. 
  There was also an Opera House Committee formed in 1954, and the Sydney Opera 
House Executive Committee (SOHEC) replaced this entity in 1957. The Committee was 
Utzon’s main client, that is, instead of interacting with the Government of New South Wales, 
Utzon only interacted with the Committee. The Committee had 3 advisory panels, one for 
architectural and constructional aspects, one for traffic and one for music and dramax. It 
continued to make requests of changes to the design and capacity based on requests from 
the Australian Broadcasting Commission and other individuals even into 1959, when 
Minjung Lee
Minjung Lee
  7
construction has already beganxi. It was therefore a definitive stakeholder, as it was Utzon’s 
main client until 1960. At this point the government became concerned with the progress 
made and decided to take control of the project directly under the Sydney Opera House Ac 
oft 1960, which effectively gave the Minister of Public Works authority to supervise the 
workxii.   
Present day stakeholders 
Today, the Sydney Opera House remains an icon to the theatrical, structural and 
architectural worlds.   The New South Wales government continues to be a primary 
stakeholder, overseeing the operations of the opera house.  The section of government that 
maintains the theater is the Sydney Opera House Trust Fund, who operates the theater on 
ehalf of the NSW government.  Although the group was created a while ago, they continue 
to help operate the Sydney Opera House. 
  A public attraction such as the Sydney Opera House attracts a lot of locals and 
tourists every year.  The main source of revenue for such a structure comes from admission 
fees, concert sales, tours and other public events.  This makes the public discretionary 
stakeholder, because though they have no power or urgency, they exhibit legitimacy. Their 
presence adds immense value to the operations of the Opera House and their absence 
would in essence destroy the primary aim of this iconic building. Their concerns and 
measures of satisfaction are therefore legitimate concerns of those in power.   
However, if the public insists on change, for whatever reason, their salience in the 
eyes of the government could quickly increase.  If, for example, the public suddenly 
ecomes unsatisfied with the operations of the opera house, they could form protests 
group and boycott ticket sales.  These actions would give the public qualities of legitimacy 
and urgency, making them dependent stakeholders.  They would be dependent on the 
government of New South Wales to take action.  It is important to note that this is only a 
theoretical situation and is meant to exemplify the dynamic nature of the Mitchell 
classification of stakeholders. 
  8
MAJOR ISSUES THAT AFFECTED THE PROJECT 
There were many uncertainties and risks associated with the Sydney Opera House 
project.  First, the design competition, though it was a good incentive, failed to evaluate 
how much experience the entrants had with large‐scale design projects.  Jørn Utzon’s shell‐
like structure won the competition, even though his designs were only partially completed. 
His designs were well ahead of their time and even as of 1959, when the government 
ordered for construction to begin, there still existed no known methods to construct the 
proposed roof structurexiii. To further complicate the initial problem, the design required 
that the roof spanned completely without columns, as Utzon wanted an open area with a 
ceiling of structural ribsxiv. 
The Sydney Opera House project had no project manager, and it was assumed that 
Utzon would take the initiative for all decisions regarding design, construction, or 
developmentxv. There were no project evaluation measures or officially in place, and for 
that reason, goalposts and implementation methods kept on changing.  Some sections of 
the opera house were even built then later demolished, re‐designed and built againxvi.  
  One aspect that was under great debate was the design of the opera house roof.  As 
mentioned earlier, there was no known way to implement the original design.  Therefore 
Utzon revised the design, however, it still proved to be a challenging and expensive task to 
actualize. 
Along with the uncertainty related to the roof, there was also uncertainty about 
government expectations of the project.  Originally, the structure was to have two theaters; 
however; government later told Utzon that they wanted four theaters, which required him 
to redesign parts of the building, thus delaying construction.  Due to these delays and 
changes in the building blueprint, both the original cost and time estimates of AUS $7 
million and four years, respectively, seemed uncertain.  As the costs continued to increase, 
an issue arose as to how this large‐scale project would be fundedxvii. 
The government initially gave no limit to available finances, and then four years 
later limited the funding resulting in discouragement, frustration and eventual withdrawal 
of Jørn Utzon in 1966xviii. The government later increased the funding massively, but Jørn 
Utzon had already left, with some of the initial blueprints, so new designs and 
  9
modifications had to be put in place.   A group of Australian architects led by Peter Hallxix 
took over and eventually completed the project, but since Utzon took his ideas with him, 
new design plans had to be created. It should be noted that because no such feat had been 
attempted before, cost estimates were highly inaccurate. In the end, the building was finally 
completed for AUS $102 millionxx, an amount much greater the initial estimate given AUS 
$7 million. 
COSTS AND BENEFITS 
Initial Analysis 
The foundations began mid 1959.  It was initially not clear how they even achieve 
the structure, as it had never been done before. They also had no precedents for 
comparison; it was therefore difficult to come up with feasible estimates. The other issue 
was that actual construction began before the design could be completed which led to a 
great amount of waste because some parts had to built then demolished then built up 
again; in addition Civil and Civic, the contractors, said that 700 drawings had been issued, 
almost half had come after the expiry of the initial contract, and that there had been 695 
amendments issued in the first phase of the project alone. xxi Estimates for the entire cost of 
construction had risen from AUS $7.2 M in 1957 to $9.8 M in 1958 to $18 M in 1961 to $ 
24.5 M in 1962 to $34.8 M in 1964 and to $48.4 M in 1965.xxii By 1968 costs estimates had 
isen tor  AUS $85 M.xxiii
  The lack of proper planning prior to the execution of this plan was partially 
esponsible for the manner in which the estimates changed. 
Lotteries used for financing   
The Government of New South Wales would give no more than AUS £100,000 and 
declared that the rest of the funding would come from public lotteriesxxiv and a public 
appeal fund. The original appeal fund raised about AUS $900,000 and the rest of the $102M 
that the Opera House ended up costing came from the profits of the lotteryxxv. In November 
of 1957, Opera House Lottery No.1 went on sale. Tickets were £5 each ($10) with a first 
prize of £100,000 ($200,000)xxvi.  This lottery was revamped in 1960 with the costs of 
  10
tickets reduced to £3 ($6) each and one‐off prizes of $200,000 introduced. The Opera 
House Lotteries raised more than $105 million towards the construction of the Sydney 
pera HouseO
 
xxvii. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This image has been removed due to
copyright restrictions.
 
 
Fig 2: Sydney Opera House original lottery ticket from ~1957­1958xxviii
The major benefit of using the lotteries as the major source of financing is that 
unlike loans or mortgages you pay back much less than you gain from the process.  It also 
saved the government from spending its own revenue, and in doing so kept the 
government from using funds that would have taken out of more essential public projects 
such healthcare, education and infrastructure. However, was this really good for the 
general public?  It has been shown in America, for example in public state lotteries, that for 
the most part:  
 
The average [lottery] expenditure in dollars for households making $10,000 is about 
the same as for those making $60,000. One implication of this pattern of demand is 
that the tax implicit in lottery finance is regressive, in the sense that as a percentage of 
income, tax payments decline as income increases.xxix
 
It can therefore be argued, that even in the case of the Sydney Opera House, it was 
the relatively less wealthy that ended up bearing a disproportionate part of the cost of 
putting this relatively luxurious and iconic structure, which they probably would not use as 
much.  So though this venture directly spared the government any direct expenditure, it 
  11
may in essence not have been very beneficial for the not so wealthy who readily bought up 
the lotteries to raise the AUS $ 100 million. 
SIGNIFICANT DECISIONS THAT AFFECTED DESIGN AND 
IMPLEMENTATION 
  During the design process and implementation of the building there were significant 
changes to the original plans.  First of all, the construction of the opera house was 
underway before the designs were finalized, resulting in cost ove
uns and organizational 
chaos.  Because of the major uncertainty in the design, costly mistakes were made during 
production.  For example, huge supporting columns were built, demolished, and rebuilt for 
a cost of $300,000 when the design changed from the original blueprint.xxx
Utzon was quite stu
orn and he refused to listen to the engineers’ solution for the 
oof, resulting in additional delays and costs.  For the first six years of the operation Utzon 
worked from Europe and refused to delegate tasks. Though Utzon had 
illiant 
architectural skills, he was not the best managerxxxi. His main concern during this time was 
the architectural aesthetics of the roof design.  This resulted in bottlenecks in the 
construction and caused delays.  These increased delays, in turn, led to high staff 
turnovers.xxxii  
Because it was still not known how the roof would actually be constructed, even 
years into the construction, the design blueprints kept on changing (as shown Fig. 3 below). 
Michael Baume, in the Sydney Opera House Affair na
ates: 
 
Civil and Civic, the contractors said that 700 drawings had been issued, almost half had 
come after the expiry of the initial contract, and that there had been 695 amendments 
issued in the first phase of the project alone. In addition, many of the items priced in the 
initial estimates that cost a total of 1.1$ M were replaced with new items that cost $3.2 
M.xxxiii
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This image has been removed due to copyright restrictions.
 
 
Figure 3: The Evolution of the Sydney Opera House Design. The general form went from just a free­hand form, 
into a parabolic, then ellipsoid form. The final shape chosen was spherical, because of the ease of construction 
and ease of calculating the structural integrity.xxxiv
The final solution was then chosen from spherical sections. The spherical selections 
were selected because, they were easy to construct from pre‐cast forms, and it was easier 
to perform a structural analysis than in the other models. This final development is shown 
in Figure 4, below. 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
  12
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This image has been removed due to copyright
estrictions.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 4: Utzon’s Final Solution to the roof problem; pre­cast spherical shapesxxxv
T r significant changes to the design after Utzon lefthe fou xxxvi: 
  After Utzon’s resignation from the project in 1966, a group of Australian architects 
led by Peter Hall took over.  As mentioned above, Utzon took some of his designs with him, 
forcing Hall and company to come up with new designs.  During this stage of construction, 
the design underwent four significant changes. 
  The first significant change to the design was to the cladding of the podium and the 
paving.  Utzon’s original intention was to use a system of prefa
icated plywood mullions.  
  13
  14
The system that was actually constructed was made to deal with the glass, which was 
ifferend t from Utzon’s design. 
  Second, there was a major change in the purposes of each of the planned rooms.  
The major hall, which was meant to be a multipurpose opera or concert hall, became solely 
a concert hall.  To accommodate the operas, the minor hall, which was originally intended 
for stag   e productions, had to be converted to serve both operas and stage productions. 
Third, two more theaters were added to the design.  This overhaul of the design 
completely changed the layout of the interiors.  The stage machinery, which had previously 
een designed and fitted inside the major hall, had to be pulled out and thrown away. 
  Fourth, the movement and redesign of the various rooms had significant impacts on 
the acoustics of the building.  Utzon had originally designed the interior with acoustics in 
mind.  His original designs were modeled and found to be acoustically perfect.  However, 
Utzon’s interior designs, including the plywood co
idor designs, as well as his seating 
designs were completely scrapped by Peter Hall and company.  Therefore, the cu
ent 
internal organization is not optimal. 
STATUS OF THE PROJECT  
The building cu
ently has 5 main auditoria and nearly 1000 rooms, a reception hall, 
5 rehearsal studios, 4 restaurants, 6 theatre bars, an extensive foyer, li
ary, and 
administrative offices.xxxvii The building covers about 1.8 hectares (4.5 acres) of its 2.2 
hectares (5.5 acre) site and has about 4.5 hectares (11 acres) of usable floor space. There 
are 645 km (400 miles) of electrical cable within this complex and its energy needs are 
equivalent to the needs of a town of 25,000 people.  More than these impressive features 
however, the Sydney Opera House became and remains a world‐class performing arts 
center, and the iconic symbol of Sydney, and to some extent, Australiaxxxviii.    
In 2007, UNESCO named the Sydney Opera House a World Heritage Site.  Today the 
institution conducts 3000 events yearly, which draw annual audiences of about 2 million.  
The Sydney Opera House also provides guided tours to 200,000 each year.xxxix   
OUR ANALYSIS OF THE RELEVANT COSTS AND BENEFITS 
 
The main aims of the financial analysis were as follows: 
• To attempt to figure out whether the Sydney Opera House was and cu
ently is a 
profitable venture. 
• To see whether it would be a self‐sustainable venture in the coming years. 
• To attempt to figure out what the value of the Sydney Opera House is to the people 
of New South Wales, and Australia in general; and figure out either what they pay 
for having this iconic building or what they receive in payments for having this 
uilding. 
For details on any of these conclusions or calculation methodology, please refer to the 
appendix. 
Analysis of Initial Construction Costs:xl
  The construction period of the Sydney Opera House lasted from about 1957‐1973.  
The initial construction can be 
oken down into three stages.  Stage I, the construction of 
the platform, lasted from 1957‐1963, with Utzon as architect.  Stage II, the implementation 
of the roof, lasted from 1963‐1967, again with Utzon as the main architect.  It should also 
e noted that Ove Arup helped Utzon come up with the final spherical design of the roof.  
Stage III, the final stage of construction, which consisted of fa
icating the interior, lasted 
from 1967‐1973 and was led by Peter Hall. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Image removed due to copyright restrictions. Original
image can be viewed here: http:
www.andreas-
praefcke.de/carthalia/world/images/aus_sydney_ope
a_9.jpg
Figure 5: Construction of the Sydney Opera Housexli
  15
http:
www.andreas-praefcke.de/carthalia/world/images/aus_sydney_opera_9.jpg
http:
www.andreas-praefcke.de/carthalia/world/images/aus_sydney_opera_9.jpg
http:
www.andreas-praefcke.de/carthalia/world/images/aus_sydney_opera_9.jpg
  16
  The costs (in actual millions) in Australian dollars for each stage, respectively, were 
AUS $5.2 M, AUS $13.2 M, and AUS $80.4 M.  The reason why Stage III cost that much is 
ecause the architects, Hall, Todd, and Littlemore had to start some aspects of the design 
from scratch.  Upon his resignation in 1966, Utzon took some of the initial blueprints with 
e.  him, forcing Peter Hall to come up with new plans, resulting in a large increase in the pric
  The following is an analysis of the present value (PV) of these costs.  It is assumed 
that the costs of each stage can be represented as a lump‐sum cost at the end of that stage’s 
year.  This analysis also neglects the effect of inflation.  Using this information, it is possible 
to estimate an amount that had to be paid per year (an annuity) during each stage of the 
project.  This can be done using the sinking fund payment equation, A = F[A/F,i,N].  In this 
case the discount rate (i) is chosen to be 8%, a typical value given to projects funded by the 
public sector.  N varies with each stage and is found by subtracting the start year of that 
period from the end year of that period.  Using the lump‐sum values, the value in 2010 can 
also be determined using the future value given the present value formula, F = P[F/P,i,N].  N 
varies with each stage and is found by subtracting the year of the lump‐sum 2010 (the year 
that the cost should be discounted to).  The results are summarized in the Table 1, below. 
Table 1: Construction Costs for the 3 key stages 
Year  Stage 
Cost  Actual 
Million  
Cost Per Year 
Discounted at 8%  
2010 Value of Costs 
Discounted at 8%  
1957  Stage 1 start    708,840.01   
1958      708,840.01   
1959      708,840.01   
  17
1960      708,840.01   
1961      708,840.01   
1962      708,840.01   
1963  Stage 1 end, Stage 2 start  5,200,000.00  2,929,354.62  193,606,463.28 
1964      2,929,354.62   
1965      2,929,354.62   
1966      2,929,354.62   
1967  Stage 2 end, Stage 3 start  13,200, XXXXXXXXXX,959,757.05  361,239,653.59 
1968      10,959,757.05   
1969      10,959,757.05   
1970      10,959,757.05   
  18
1971      10,959,757.05   
1972      10,959,757.05   
1973  Stage 3 end  80,400,000.00   1,386,548,297.03 
…         
2010     
Present Value  of 
construction costs:  1,941,394,413.90 
 
The following graph shows the annual expenditures during the construction period 
of the Sydney Opera House. It should be noted that all these funds other than an initial AUS 
 100,000 given by the government, were obtained via public lotteries. $
 
 
Graph 1: Estimated Construction Expenditure 
 
  By looking at the table above, it is seen that the 2010 value of the construction costs 
is about AUS $2 billion, which is quite a large number considering the fact that the costs in 
actual million was about AUS $100 M.  The conversion from Australian dollars to US dollars 
is about a 1 to 1 ratio.  This shows the powerful effect of figuring out future values given 
past values.  In retrospect, $2 billion may not be that much, considering how much the 
government spends every day.  In our initial assumptions, we thought that the value of 
eing such an iconic structure throughout all these years would outweigh this cost.  
However, our cash flows from the period of operation tell a different story. 
It is important to note that this analysis was only performed for the costs of the 
initial construction period.  Since 1973, the Sydney Opera House has gone through several 
enovations and transformations, from exterior and interior upgrades to creation of an 
underground parking lot.  These renovations have increased its costs and expenditure 
significantly. 
Analysis of Operational Period (1973‐2010): 
For the period it has been in operation, we use the annual financial reports for the 
exact details of the revenue and expenditure. 
  19
Revenuexlii
The Sydney Opera House receives great volumes of money each year. For purposes 
of comparison, we 
ing all the revenue received since the official opening until 2010 and 
discount them at 8% to 
ing all the values to present value as of 2010. We use 8% because 
it is a typical approximate discount rate in long‐term public service project. We classify this 
as a public project because the government allocates most of the revenue to it, as we will 
see in the cash flow diagrams shown below. The revenue received from operations came 
from tickets sales, shows, merchandizing, catering, festivals and tours, and grants from 
private donors. 
 
 
Graph 2: Revenue Breakdown for Operation period (2010 AUS$) 
 
Graph 3: Revenue Breakdown for Operation period (%) 
 
  20
In the top‐most cash flow diagram, we look at volumes of money received in the 
second we see what fractions came purely from the government and what came from 
operations of the House. Over the years the Sydney Opera House has been open, they have 
eceived a total of ~AUS $ 5.6 billion (2010 value); of that AUS $2.85 billion dollars has 
een from the government.  
Expenditurexliii
When we look additionally into the expenditure over the years, we note that the 
expenditure was always greater than the operational revenue, and had it not been for the 
government endowments, the Sydney Opera House would perpetually be in debt. The 
values given for expenditure mostly arose from salaries of staff, depreciation of the 
property and maintenance & repairs. This building is always in need of great amount of 
epair, maintenance and renovation, and thus renovations and repair form a great part of 
the expenditure. 
  The total expenditure over the years the Sydney Opera House has been in operation 
amounts to ~AUS$ 5.5 billion, a number very close to the total revenues received. In 
following cash flow diagrams we compare the expenditure to the revenues, with and 
without the government contributions, in an attempt to analyze whether the project would 
e self‐sustainable, and the answer seems to a be a resounding “no” seeing that there is not 
a single year where the operational revenue would meet the expenditure. 
 
  21
Graph 4: Operational Revenue and Expenditure Breakdown without Government 
Contributions (2010 AUS $) 
 
Net Cash Flows 
The net cash flows clarify the magnitude of the expenditure even further. The NPV 
of the Total Summation of Net Cash Flows in 2010 value comes to AUS $100 million, which 
looks somewhat dismal considering the amount of money that has been invested into this 
project. We should note that this amount does not include the NPV of construction costs. 
 
 
 
Graph 5: Net Cash Flows without Government Contributions (2010 AUS $) 
  22
 
  23
Graph 6: Net Cash Flows (2010 AUS $) 
CRITIQUE OF THE PROJECT AND PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESS 
W  a profitable venture? 
  In this financial analysis, two periods were looked at: the construction period and 
the period during which the Sydney Opera House was operated.  The present values (in 
2010) of the costs and benefits incu
ed during these time periods were calculated using a 
discoun
as it
t rate of 8%.   
During the construction period, only costs were incu
ed and the present value of 
the construction cost is about AUS $2 B.  From 1973 to the present day, the present value of 
the costs is about AUS $5.5 B.  During this same time period, benefits from operations and 
government revenues have a present value of about AUS ~$5.6 B.  Subtracting the benefits 
from the costs results in a net cash flow of about AUS ~$100 M.  It is important to note that 
about AUS $2.9 B of the revenue (a little over half!) was from the government.  It can then 
e concluded that AUS $2.7 B was accumulated through the actual operation of the opera 
house.  If the cost (AUS $5.5 B) is subtracted from the operating revenues, the present value 
net cash flow is AUS ‐$2.8 B, which is a large deficit.  It is important to note that this does 
not take into account the construction costs.  Adding in the construction costs 
ings the 
operational cash flow even lower to about AUS ‐$4.8 B. 
The results from the analysis show that from a strictly financial standpoint, the 
Sydney Opera House was not a viable project at all.  So why is it that the Sydney Opera 
House is still standing today despite its financial flaws?  This question will be addressed in 
the next section. 
H e are attempting to quantify its value to the people of New South Wales? 
  From the analysis, it shows that the Sydney Opera House is not a profitable project.  
However, today it remains an apex in the world of architecture for its innovative design.  It 
also hosts over a thousand operas, concerts, etc. per year.  Its iconic value to the citizens of 
New South Wales and Australia is most likely what is keeping the structure in commission.  
Its iconic value is quite hard to quantify, however, as seen above the opera house’s 
ow w
  24
operational activities would have not been enough to 
eak even.  The government of New 
South Wales has contributed a present value of almost AUS $3 B to the opera house to help 
keep it in function.  The government might know that the Sydney Opera House is not doing 
well financially; however, to the people of New South Wales it remains an important icon.  
Therefore, as a rough estimate, the iconic value of the opera house to the public can be 
estimated as the government’s contribution throughout the years, a value of nearly AUS $3 
B. 
I ancially sustainable for the future? 
  In the past ten years, it seems that the Sydney Opera House has at least been 
contributing 50% of the revenue solely through its operations.  Even though this is over 
half of their revenues through their years, the ratio of operational revenue to government 
evenue should be much higher.  Considering the fact that in these next years, the Sydney 
Opera House plans to undergo more renovations and total refu
ishment, cu
ently valued 
at AUS $800 billion
s it fin
xliv, additional costs will be accrued.  The opera house is already in huge 
debt and this will only increase in the next decade or so.  Operational revenues will 
probably not increase much, so therefore government revenue must increase to help 
finance these expenditures.  Because the Sydney Opera House is such an icon, the 
government will probably continue to fund it for a while.  However, at one point the 
government may realize that it cannot continue to fund the opera house, and will 
eventually suspend funding.  Therefore, it does not seem that the Sydney Opera House is 
definitely financially sustainable for the future. 
Additional Information: What does the AUS $ 800 million Total Refu
ishment 
ecommended in 2010 really mean?  
he table below compares it to cu
ent maintenance costs from the past decade. T
 
Table 2: Maintenance Costs for 2000­2010 
Year  Expenditure In 
Actual Dollars 
(AUS $) 
Expenditure in 2010 
dollars using 8% 
(AUS $) 
Expenditure in 2010 
dollars using 5% 
(AUS $) 
Expenditure in 2010 
dollars using 2.5% 
(AUS $) 
  25
2000  15,467,000  33,392,093  25,194,113  19,799,068 
2001  13,493,000  26,972,569  20,932,072  16,850,908 
2002  15,310,000  28,337,742  22,619,843  18,653,748 
2003  15,109,000  25,894,171  21,259,880  17,959,853 
2004  16,420,000  26,056,476  22,004,370  19,042,166 
2005  16,987,000  24,959,476  21,680,195  19,219,231 
2006  18,344,000  24,956,809  22,297,247  20,248,344 
2007  14,821,000  18,670,192  17,157,160  15,960,596 
2008  15,968,000  18,625,075  17,604,720  16,776,380 
2009  17,849,000  19,276,920  18,741,450  18,295,225 
2010  17,939,000  17,939,000  17,939,000  17,939,000 
 
Seeing that they need to add about $800 million to the maintenance budget to keep 
it in operation; if for example the maintenance was prioritized such that only about AUS 
$40 million was used every year for the next ten years, this would mean that the Sydney 
Opera House would need to on average triple expenditure on maintenance to handle both 
the regular annual maintenance works and ca
y out the required renovation. For this to 
emain a feasible option, we would need to consider other options for funding: Would the 
government be willing to finance this? Would the people of New South Wales find this a 
worthy venture to invest in for the next ten year? Based on cu
ent operational revenue, 
would this be considered a profitable venture by private financiers? Cu
ently, the future 
seems bleak for many of these options seeing that its operational revenue already does not 
meet the annual expenditure.
Critique of the Project and Conclusions from Our Project 
From th
Evaluation Process 
is project, and the mistakes made therein, we learn: 
We learn the importance of planning well before implementing a project. Complete 
designs would have saved this project a great amount of money and time. 
  We learn that it is important to consult with other experts when embarking on an 
unprecedented venture. The initial cost estimates and structural sketches had been given 
with out structural expertise, this also led to many iterations of the design, and could have 
een avoided to some extent. 
  26
  The choice material and final design greatly influence final maintenance costs. In the 
case of the Sydney Opera House, the final design and material choice has led to high 
aintem nance costs over the years due to its very delicate form. 
  The project has shown the importance of implementing a good project management 
strategy, especially when implementing a large‐scale unprecedented plan. Utzon was 
known to be a 
illiant architect but very poor manager. Seeking a project manager would 
have been of great benefit to this process. 
  It also shows as the importance of having government backing. Government support 
and approval of this plan enabled it to have large access to public funds created via a public 
lottery, and this ensured that the finances were always catered for during the construction 
period. In the operating life, the government has also continued to keep the Opera House 
float. a
 
Comments on the Project Evaluation Process 
  The financial analysis given in this report is by no means 100% accurate.  Several 
assumptions were made throughout the financial analysis to simply the process.  First of 
all, we only know for sure the exchange rate of the AUS $ to the US $ in 2010, it is therefore 
slightly difficult to get a feel for what the Actual 1972 Australian Dollars means in 1972 US$  
as we do not have exchange rate data to span the length of the project. We therefore 
ing 
all AUS $ to 2010 value and then compare these values to USD. We do note that this is an 
approximation and that there are many economic nuances that this simplification does not 
address.  
In addtion, when discounting the cash flows back to the present day, a discount rate 
of 8% is assumed throughout, as this the discount rate assigned to most public sector 
projects.xlv  The discount rate can easily change from year to year, especially during the 
various construction stages of the project.  Also, it has been assumed that the construction 
costs for the three stages are paid as a lump sum at the end of each stage, which can then be 
modeled as an annuity.  In reality, the costs probably varied from year to year.  There may 
also be a little variation between the actual cash flows from 1973‐2010 and what is shown 
above.  Although the official financial reports of the Sydney Opera House were obtained, 
  27
there was a lot of financial data that it was difficult to sift through what was actually 
elevant for the financial analysis. 
However, had these simplifications and assumptions not been made, it would have 
een very difficult to ca
y out a financial analysis.  There are too many different variables 
and dynamic elements that would have to be accounted for to perform a flawless analysis.  
Despite these circumstances, the authors feel that they have captured the essence of a 
thorough financial analysis of the Sydney Opera House.    
 
 
 
 
APPENDIX 
General Formulas 
It is possible to estimate an amount that had to be paid per year (an annuity) during each 
tage of the project.  This can be done using the sinking fund payment equation: s
 
A = F[A/F,i,N] = F*[i/((1+i)N‐1)] 
 
N is the amount of years the annuity has to be paid to meet a certain future value F given a 
ertain discount rate, i.   c
 
Given a past cash flow, it is possible to discount it to the future using the following 
quation: e
 
F = P[F/P, i, N] = P*(1+i%)N 
 
  28
N varies by year and is found by subtracting the year of the past value from 2010 (the year 
that the cash flow should be discounted to).  The discount rate (i) is taken to be 8% as 
mentioned above. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R
 
evenue From Operational Period 
YEAR 
Revenue 
from 
Operations 
(Actual 
Millions) 
Revenue 
from 
Operations 
(2010
Answered Same Day Jun 07, 2020 PPMP20010 Central Queensland University

Solution

Aarti J answered on Jun 08 2020
144 Votes
Analysis of cost and/or schedule ove
uns: Are the reasons given for the cost and/or time ove
uns encountered during the project appropriate?
Sydney opera house is considered as one of the biggest planning disaster. The project was planned to start in the year 1957 with the projected budget of AUS $7 million, whereas the project took more than 14 years to get completed with the cost of $102 million.
One of the common reason for the cost ove
un was the mismanagement and the inappropriate planning. The actual construction of the project started in the year 1989.
As the Sydney Opera house was a very big project, the estimation of the cost and other aspects should have been done from a very detailed perspective. The design of Sydney Opera house was inadequate because of which the cost estimation was highly inaccurate. The structure design was quite complicated and the architects were not able to decide on the...
SOLUTION.PDF

Answer To This Question Is Available To Download

Related Questions & Answers

More Questions »

Submit New Assignment

Copy and Paste Your Assignment Here