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IKC101 - Indigenous Australian Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities Item No. Title Value Due Date* Return Date** 1 Journal Entry 10% 22-Jul-2018 13-Aug-2018 2 Media Critique 20% 19-Aug-2018...

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IKC101 - Indigenous Australian Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities
    Item No.
    Title
    Value
    Due Date*
    Return Date**
    1
    Journal Entry
    10%
    22-Jul-2018
    13-Aug-2018
    2
    Media Critique
    20%
    19-Aug-2018
    07-Sep-2018
    3
    Essay
    40%
    16-Sep-2018
    09-Oct-2018
    4
    Professional Planning Document
    30%
    12-Oct-2018
    02-Nov-2018
 
Assessment item 2
Media Critique
Value: 20%
Due Date: 19-Aug-2018
Return Date: 07-Sep-2018
Length: 800 words
Submission method options: EASTS (online)
Task
Key concepts:
· Institutionalised ideas and taken-for-granted assumptions of the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. 
· Constructions of Indigenous Australians in popular and other media.
Over module one you have reflected on your knowledge and understanding about yourself in relation to the construction of ideas about collective Australian culture, including of Indigenous Australians. In this task you will critique two examples from the Media to investigate how ideas about Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are reproduced and reinforced institutionally.
You will choose two articles to analyse.
Article 1: Aboriginal Activism in 1930-40s
Article 2: Victoria says 'no' to changing Anzac Day
Article 3: First Fleet good for Aboriginals [sic]
You must provide a separate critique of 400 words for each article.
Use the following guide questions to assist you to focus each critique but do not respond to each question individually. You must provide a synthesised response which considers your own pre-existing knowledge and cultural competence.
1. Thinking about  your knowledge of Australian history, does the author provide all the information required to understand the issue being discussed? What information is missing?
2. Is there a presumption that readers already hold views about Indigenous peoples? What are the taken-for-granted assumptions?
3. What would a reader infer about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples based on the text of the article? How are Indigenous and non-Indigenous people positioned in the article?
4. Is there an Indigenous viewpoint included in the article? If yes, how does the author use Indigenous perspectives to support or contradict the main message? If no, how could this influence a readers' perception of Indigenous people and of the main message in the article? 
5. How might Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers interpret the ideas expressed?
This task does not require you to express your opinion on the points made in the articles. You must critique the article to identify the main ideas that are evident and then analyse the sub-text - ‘reading-between-the lines’ – to investigate the impact of the message in reinforcing ideas about Australian culture and Indigenous peoples and issues.
 
Rationale
ack to top
This assessment task will assess the following learning outcome/s:
· be able to investigate, compare and reflect on standpoint to explain Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples' historical positioning.
· be able to describe, analyse and theorise individual and collective standpoint in relation to Indigenous peoples' experiences of Australian history.
This task extends on Task 1 to work toward meeting the following IKC101 Learning Outcomes:
LO1: Be able to investigate, compare and reflect on standpoint to explain Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples’ historical positioning;
LO2: Be able to describe, analyse, and theorise individual and collective standpoint in relation to Indigenous peoples' experience of Australian history.
In Task 1 you focussed on the reflection of your own knowledge and the influences on how you came to know things about Indigenous Australians. If you are Indigenous, or have connections with an Indigenous community or group, you will have access to more social knowledge than those who are not Indigenous or do not have such associations.
Task 2 requires you to apply your self-reflection to the critique of two media articles. If you lack knowledge about a topic or issue institutions like the media may more easily persuade you to adopt a particular perspective. There is also knowledge that we take-for-granted because powerful institutions like schools, churches, government, the media (and social media) reinforce them.
Marking criteria and standards
ack to top
 
 
    Works toward Learning Outcomes 1 and 2
    Assessable component
    HD
17 – 20 / 20
    D
15 – 16 / 20
    CR
13 – 14 / 20
    P
10 – 12 / 20
    F
0 – 9 / 20
    Critique demonstrates self-reflection on developing cultural competence from the student’s baseline articulated in Task 1.
 
 
 
 
3 marks
 
    Discusses how your pre-existing knowledge positions you to understand the issues discussed in the article.
Integrates this description into your critique to make links between your cultural competence reflection and the
oader impact on readers more generally.
    Discusses how your pre-existing knowledge positions you to understand the issues discussed in the article. Makes links between your cultural competence reflections and the
oader impact on readers more generally.
    Discusses how your pre-existing knowledge positions you to understand the issues discussed in the article.
Summarises one way in which your cultural competence reflection is linked to the impact on readers more generally.
    Describes how your pre-existing knowledge positions you to understand the issues discussed in the article.
 
    No evidence of further reflection on your cultural competence or consideration of how your pre-existing knowledge positions you to understand the issues discussed in the article.
    Identifies and provides a comparative analysis of the positioning of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in the article. 
8 marks
 
    Identifies and analyses how the text and sub-text of both articles can influence readers’ interpretation of the issues discussed.
Demonstrates understanding of the overt and covert reinforcement of social, cultural, and historical differences of Indigenous Australians in the comparison.
 
    Identifies and analyses how the text and sub-text of each article can influence readers’ interpretation of the issues discussed.
Demonstrates understanding of the overt or covert reinforcement of social, cultural, and/or historical differences of Indigenous Australians in the comparison.
 
    Identifies how the text and sub-text of each article can influence readers’ interpretation of the issues discussed. Analysis compares how Indigenous and non-Indigenous people may interpret the ideas expressed.  
 
    Identifies how the text of each article positions both Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers to interpret the issues discussed. Provides a general comparison of how Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers may interpret the ideas expressed.  
    Does not identify how the text of each article positions both Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers to interpret the issues discussed. Does not compare the ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers may interpret the ideas expressed in the article.
 
    Examines evidence of overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the text and what this implies about the presumed relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Identifies the impact of the absence or presence of Indigenous Australian viewpoints in reinforcing readers’ perceptions.
 
 
 
 
5 marks
    Identifies and examines the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the texts. Analyses how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media to reinforce ideas about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Provides an integrated analysis that discusses the potential implications of Indigenous viewpoints on readers’ perceptions.
 
 
    Identifies and examines the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the texts which includes a discussion of how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media. Discusses how this could reinforce ideas about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and identifies the potential implications of Indigenous viewpoints on readers’ perceptions.
 
    Identifies the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the texts which includes a discussion of how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media. Describes how this could reinforce ideas about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The absence and / or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the text is linked to the discussion of overt and covert assumptions and how this could reinforce reader's perceptions. 
 
    Identifies the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in each article. Explains how these assumptions are similar to views about Indigenous Australians in the media. Explains how those assumptions are used in the media to imply a particular relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Identifies Indigenous viewpoints in the texts. 
 
    Does not describe the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in each article. Does not describe how those assumptions are used [in the media] to imply a particular relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Does not identify Indigenous viewpoints in each article.
 
    Fulfils technical aspects of the task.
 
 
 
 
 
 
4 marks
 
    Writing shows control and skilful construction of expression to convey specific understandings. Response to each criterion is integrated into a well-synthesis analytical critique.
    Written expression shows clear organisation. Both critiques are structured cohesively and clearly articulated.
    There are no e
ors relating to writing and references and terminology. There are no imprecise statements or generalisations.
    Within required word count. Uses formal written expression consistently with few e
ors. Developing skills in using appropriate terminology. Quotes are 10 words or fewer.
    Not within required word count. Uses informal written expression or there are many e
ors which impede comprehension. No evidence of consideration of appropriate terminology. More than 10 words are quotes. 
 
 

Introduction to cultural competence.
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Reading Description:
Ranzjin, R., McConnochie, K. R., & Nolan, W XXXXXXXXXXIntroduction to cultural competence. In
Psychology and Indigenous Australians : foundations of cultural competence (pp. 3-
12). South Ya
a, VIC : Palgrave/Macmillan.
Reading Description Disclaimer:
(This reference information is provided as a guide only, and may not conform to the required
eferencing standards for your subject)
Introduction to cultural
competence
Introduction
Cultural competence is essential if we are to work effectively with people from
diverse cultural backgrounds.Western psychologists (and most Australian psychologists
today are from a Western cultural background) are reasonably culturally competent
when they work with Western clients or communities, since they share aspects of
the same culture and therefore 'know' the culture of the Western client. However,
many Western psychologists have a poor understanding of non-Western cultures.
This may result in misunderstanding. miscommunication and reduced effectiveness
of treatment and intervention.
If a non-Western potential client, who may need psychological intervention, feels
that a Western practitioner or therapist does not understand them or is not sensitive to
their cultural differences, they may be dete
ed from attending an initial appointment
or, if they have managed to come once, they may not come again. In extreme cases, a
practitioner who is culturally incompetent may do more harm than good.
People are culturally diverse in a large range of attributes, including ethnicity,
socioeconomic background, gender, sexual orientation, and level of physical or
intellectual ability. (Culture
Answered Same Day Aug 05, 2020 IKC101 Charles Sturt University

Solution

Soumi answered on Aug 10 2020
138 Votes
Running Head: MEDIA CRITIQUE        1
MEDIA CRITIQUE:        7
INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN CULTURES, HISTORIES AND CONTEMPORARY REALITIES
ASSESSMENT ITEM 2: MEDIA CRITIQUE
Table of Contents
Critique of article on ‘Aboriginal Activism in 1930-40s’    3
Critique of article on ‘Victoria says ‘no’ to changing Anzac Day’    4
References    6
Critique of article on ‘Aboriginal Activism in 1930-40s’
The article described the incident in the life of the Australia’s aboriginal’s activist William Cooper-led delegation, who presented a resolution to the German counsel-general condemning German’s Nazis for persecution of the Jews in Germany in 1938 and discussed the possible reason for its refusal. Aboriginals were the original inhabitants of the land and held the distinctive rights as Australia’s first people. The origin of the cultural divide in the country began with the earliest contact with British Colonisers in 1788, which resulted into frontier conflicts for over 150 years and divided Australia into indigenous or the original inhabitants and non-indigenous people. As informed by Gorman et al. (2015), the first invaders Britishers invaded Australia and slaughtered the indigenous people on a grand scale. This is evident from the fact that, Tasmania recorded 90% decline in the indigenous population in just 30 years, between 1804 and 1834, and by the middle of 19th century, aboriginals were reduced to minority. The aboriginals continued to face discriminations and continued to fight for their rights in their own land. Despite some recent improvements, aboriginals are still recognised as one of the most vulnerable groups in the country (Hamilton, 2017).
In 1938, Nazi conducted a pogrom against Jewish community, which was condemned by Australians aboriginals led by William Cooper. Aboriginals support for Jews and special resolution against Nazis could be explained from the fact that there were parallel similarities between aboriginal’s history in Australia and Jewish community in Nazi ruled Germany. As mentioned by Donovan (2012), both groups were mercilessly assaulted and discriminated in their own respective land. On the other hand, in 1938, Australian government refused to recognise racial problems in their own land and did not...
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