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CIVE 2261

Materials for the Built Environment
Laboratory Manual
Revised 2019
Revised by Prof. C. M. Shillaber
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
College of Engineering, Northeastern University








Companion Labs to CIVE 2261: Materials for the Built Environment




Copyright © 2019 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering






For edits, questions, comments, contact:

Craig M. Shillaber, Ph.D.
Assistant Teaching Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
College of Engineering
Northeastern University
400 Snell Engineering Center
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
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Acknowledgements:

J. Hajjar
T. Sheahan
S. Cranford
K. Schulte-Graham
C. Venegas-Martinez
M. MacNeil


ADMET, Inc.
Rich Gedney
mailto: XXXXXXXXXX
CIVE 2261 Lab Manual

i | F r o n t M a t t e r

Preface

“In the spirit of science, there really is no such thing as a 'failed experiment.' Any test that yields
valid data is a valid test.”
Adam Savage, Mythbuster

Intended Laboratory Manual Use
This laboratory manual is intended to be used across one semester in the course CIVE 2261: Lab for CIVE
2260 offered by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Northeastern University in
Boston, Massachusetts. This course is intended to be taken concu
ently with CIVE 2260: Materials for
the Built Environment. The laboratory exercises provide hands-on, experiential understanding to
complement the theory and concepts discussed in CIVE 2260.
Details neglected herein are assumed to be presented either in class or in lab via lecture.
Note also that the labs listed herein are subject to revision at the behest of the instructo
professor.
Laboratory Overview
In this class, you will be introduced to standard laboratory procedures for materials testing, data reduction
and data analysis methods.
This manual is comprised of five laboratories; however, the instructo
professor may adjust this number.
Laboratory methods and determinations covered in this manual include: uniaxial tension, concrete mixing
and testing, fracture analysis, and flaw tolerance. The operation and use of computer-based test control
and data acquisition systems are also covered.
Each lab will consist of a short lecture/introduction, conducting a lab test (or tests), and clean-up. The labs
should be readily completed within the allotted time period.
Cu
ently, the labs are designed for group work and group lab reports. Confirm with your
instructo
professor.
By participating in this laboratory and completing the assignments, you will gain experience preparing
laboratory reports using effective technical writing skills, including graphic presentation of data.
Laboratory Objectives
The primary objectives of the Materials for the Built Environment Laboratory are as follows:
1. Apply accepted standards (i.e., ASTM Standards) related to laboratory testing of materials to
determine mechanical properties.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of stress and strain and how they relate to test
esults and overall material performance.
3. Explain different failure modes (e.g.,
ittle vs. ductile, fracture), flaw tolerance and material
toughness.
CIVE 2261 Lab Manual

ii | F r o n t M a t t e r

4. Explain how to design concrete mixes for particular applications, including the effect of water
content.
5. Explain how to mix concrete and prepare specimens for strength testing.
6. Write effective technical reports to communicate the results of their laboratory testing,
including preparing effective graphics.
CIVE 2261 Lab Manual

iii | F r o n t M a t t e r

Table of Contents

Preface .......................................................................................................................... XXXXXXXXXXi
Table of Contents ......................................................................................................... XXXXXXXXXXiii
Laboratory Safety and Safety Training Assignment ..................................................... XXXXXXXXXX1
1. Laboratory #1: Uniaxial Tension ........................................................................... XXXXXXXXXX9
2. Laboratory #2: Concrete Mix .............................................................................. XXXXXXXXXX17
3. Laboratory #3: Fracture Analysis ........................................................................ XXXXXXXXXX33
4. Laboratory #4: Flaw Tolerance ........................................................................... XXXXXXXXXX39
5. Laboratory #5: Concrete Testing ........................................................................ XXXXXXXXXX44
Appendix A: Lab Report Requirements .....................................................
Answered Same DayFeb 23, 2022

Solution

Sonam answered on Feb 24 2022
75 Votes
• Brief description/intro of surveying labs
Surveying is primarily utilised to fix the national and state boundaries, chart coastlines, navigable streams and lakes, establishing control points, execute hydrographic and oceanographic charting and mapping, prepare topographic map of land surface of the earth, prepare plan or map of the area surveyed, collect field data, analyse and to calculate the field parameters for setting out operation of actual engineering works. Moreover, during execution, project of any magnitude is constructed along the lines and points established by surveying. Thus, surveying is a basic requirement for all Civil Engineering projects.
Part 1: Leveling
• Brief introduction of leveling
Levelling is a method of surveying used for determination of the difference of elevations or levels of various points on the surface of the earth. The elevation of a point is its' vertical distance above or below a reference level, called datum. The most commonly used datum is the mean sea level (M.S.L.). The levelling deals with distances in a vertical plane.
Levelling is an important method of surveying for many engineering works and construction projects. Levelling is required to determine the undulations of the earth's surface for topographic mapping. Levelling is needed for the design of highways, railways, canals, sewers, etc., and for locating the gradient lines.
Levelling is essential for the layout of construction projects, for locating the excavation levels, and for the control of various elevations in buildings,
idges, dams, etc. The drainage characteristics of the area can be obtained by levelling, The results of the levelling can be used to determine the catchment area, volume of the reservoir and the area submerged by a reservoir. The results of levelling can also be used to determine the volume of earthwork for roads, railways, etc.
• Brief description of procedure
1. Instrument level is setup at convenient positions near first point (say A).
2. Temporary adjustments should be done, (setting up, leveling up, elimination of a parallot) are Performed.
3. First sight of B.M (point of known elevation) is taken and reading is entered in back Sight column.
4. If distance is large instrument is shifted, the instrument becomes turning point (or)...
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