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Project Overview Introduction During this course you will be required to undertake a major design project. In this project you will design the model of the stormwater management system that is located...

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Project Overview
Introduction
During this course you will be required to undertake a major design project.
In this project you will design the model of the stormwater management system that is located
at the northern edge of the campus.
Overview
In civil engineering terminology, the rainwater and rainwater run-off occu
ing when it rains is
known as stormwater.
For engineers, managing the stormwater run-off is a very important matter. Water must not be
allowed to pool on roads or pathways, and it must not be allowed to soak into the subsoil or
foundations and footings around roads, or buildings.
Managing the stormwater usually consists of directing the water away from the a) roads, b)
pathways, c) carparks, d) roofs of buildings, and e) semi-permeable grounds; and collecting in
temporary storage areas called sumps, and possibly causing the stormwater to be piped to the
ocean or estuarine system and released.
Depending upon what the nature of the su
oundings areas are like, there may be a large
number of sealed roads and footpaths, and other impermeable structures such as buildings
covering the ground. Other areas may be semi-permeable; being largely grass, exposed soil, or
gardens and bushland. In the semi-permeable areas, the stormwater may tend to seep away.
In our project, we are considering the north-western part of ECU's Joondalup campus.
This area is managed by a system of two sumps, which capture the water from the north-
western side of the campus. One sump is 1200mm higher than the other. The two sumps are
connected by a 300mm diameter pipe.
You are to consider the ground, which is higher than both the sumps, which includes, and is to
the west of Kendrew Crescent. The areas that you should include is shown within the
highlighted region on the map shown below. The rising ground continues only part the way to
Grand Boulevard on the west, and part of the way to the carpark on the south-west; and part
way up towards Teakle Court on the north.
You will need to do a site visit (if you have not done so yet), to determine what sort of ground
cover that you are dealing with (i.e. permeable, or impermeable), and to determine where the
high points are within the highlighted region, which are the limits of your catchment areas.
Many of us have done a walk around the sump areas, and if you have not yet done so, you
should take a walk around here too. You will want to identify the approximate shape and
dimensions of the sumps to in order to calculate the volumes of each of them.
MATLAB
This design project will include the development of a fully working MATLAB analysis /
simulation.
Groups are NOT being used in this project.
Project Deliverables
1. Detailed design of your model.
2. How you translated the real world into mathematical form.
3. Working MATLAB analysis / simulation.
4. Detailed documentation showing:
A. Physical characteristic of the storm-water system:
• Permeability of the soils,
• The types of ground-cover present,
o Non-permeable - e.g. Asphalt Roads or concrete
o Permeable - e.g. Grass or sand
• Geometrical shape and sizes,
• Other factors.
B. Each of the assumptions that have been made.
C. The geographical layout is very important. You must take into account:
• the location and size of trees,
• runoff and catchment areas.
Project Philosophy
The major idea is to be able to translate a physical situation into a mathematical form, and
model it using standard engineering software tools; such as MATLAB and others can be
used, but are not essential.
What is important is that we can follow your thinking processes, and identify your
engineering approach to modelling.
Storm Water Management Areas
The analysis is to be ca
ied out on the Northern end of the Campus; as shown below.
The road view is as follows:
Function of the Management Areas
The purpose of these two storm-water management areas is to remove the stormwater from the
oads, paths, buildings and other run-off; and to capture it and hold it to reduce the likelihood
of local flooding.
Once the stormwater has been captured in these management areas, it is able to soak away
through the permeable grass and soil.
Here is a recent photo of Area 2, after the rains.
The water soaks away through the grass, and the trees remove water from the sub-soil.
Runoff Model
• Take measurements of the sizes using Google Earth / Maps; or even physically
measuring it out if you wish.
• Determine non-permeable catchment areas.
• Determine permeable areas; volume of the management areas.
• Calculate likely levels using a related rates model.
Project Documentation
Your project documentation must include the following major components:
• all assumptions
• design of your soil analysis and results
• determination of catchment areas and performance of various surfaces
• Runoff model
• development of the overall model
• calculations
• validation
Design Assumptions
The project documentation will include all the relevant design assumptions.
Design
A detailed design must be provided.
This design shows your methodology and the calculations that you have employed.
Permeability Tests and Soil Analysis
The results of the preliminary permeability tests of your chosen soils are to be provided, along
with your analysis.
Soil Analysis
You must present the relevant theory and algorithms employed in your project.
Validation
Your documentation will show the means by which you have validated and tested your
algorithm and methodology, and how you have shown your MATLAB simulation to be co
ect.
It is important that you also include your tests and samples of output.
Software Tools
MATLAB OR Other Suitable Software - e.g. C++ or Excel can be used.
The source code or design \for your working MATLAB / C++, or Excel etc simulation must
e included. An explanation of the structure of the program must be provided. If you use Excel,
you must ensure that you LABEL your model clearly, and that the formulas are visible in the
LABELS
Analysis of your model
Identify and discuss the design decisions that you incorporated into your model.
Your explanations as to why you made the decisions should be quite detailed.
Identify and explain at least three improvements that you could make to your tests, analysis,
model; or things that you could do differently, so that it would meet the design criteria more
effectively.
This could include a discussion of your approach, problems encountered, what you experienced
etc
Gathering Data
Dimensions
• Measure the size of the areas as accurately as you can using simple manual methods.
(Accuracy to +/- 0.25 meter)
• Assume that the northern stormwater sump is 1200mm lower than the southern sump.
• Assume that a 300mm ID (internal diameter) pipe connects the two sumps.
• Assume that the northern sump does not have another drain.
• Use trigonometry to get the depths of the sumps, and to calculate their shapes and volume.
Soil Types
• Use standard Western Australian soil types.
• For your tests, determine what soil that you are using; assume that the sump has the same
soil type.
Environment
• Determine the relevant environmental factors.
• Use information provided from Western Australian sources; eg. BOM (Bureau of
Meteorology).
Validation
• Use industry standard calculators, and tables to validate your assumptions and
calculations.
• They should form part of your report. (Note - they are NOT the report)
Marks Breakdown
Assumptions 1
• State all your assumptions.
• Provide justifications for each one.
Analysis of the problem 2
• Break your problem down into the component parts
Soil analysis 3
Overall Model 3.5
• Describe your situation in mathematical terms.
• Explain the governing equations and laws.
• Develop the overall model in detail.
• Show how the component parts interact together.
Runoff model 2
Implementation 4
• Implement in mathematical terms.
• Full implementation in software.
Testing and Validation 3
• Test the completed model.
• Show how you have validated the model.
• Provide the full test suite.
Conclusions 1.5
• How did the model perform?
• How well does it represent reality?
• What were the problems?
• How could it be improved?
    Project Overview
    Project Documentation
    Gathering Data
    Dimensions
    Soil Types
    Environment
    Validation
    Marks Breakdown
    Assumptions 1
    Analysis of the problem 2
    Soil analysis 3
    Overall Model 3.5
    Runoff model 2
    Implementation 4
    Testing and Validation 3
    Conclusions 1.5

Project Overview
Introduction
During this course you will be required to undertake a major design project.
In this project you will design the model of the stormwater management system that is located
at the northern edge of the campus.
Overview
In civil engineering terminology, the rainwater and rainwater run-off occu
ing when it rains is
known as stormwater.
For engineers, managing the stormwater run-off is a very important matter. Water must not be
allowed to pool on roads or pathways, and it must not be allowed to soak into the subsoil or
foundations and footings around roads, or buildings.
Managing the stormwater usually consists of directing the water away from the a) roads, b)
pathways, c) carparks, d) roofs of buildings, and e) semi-permeable grounds; and collecting in
temporary storage areas called sumps, and possibly causing the stormwater to be piped to the
ocean or estuarine system and released.
Depending upon what the nature of the su
oundings areas are like, there may be a large
number of sealed roads and footpaths, and other impermeable structures such as buildings
covering the ground. Other areas may be semi-permeable; being largely grass, exposed soil, or
gardens and bushland. In the semi-permeable areas, the stormwater may tend to seep away.
In our project, we are considering the north-western part of ECU's Joondalup campus.
This area is managed by a system of two sumps, which capture the water from the north-
western side of the campus. One sump is 1200mm higher than the other. The two sumps are
connected by a 300mm diameter pipe.
You are to consider the ground, which is higher than both the sumps, which includes
Answered Same Day Jun 01, 2021 Edith Cowan University

Solution

Rahul answered on Jun 10 2021
151 Votes
Stormwater iiManagement iiSystem iiof iiNorth-Western iiPart iiof iiECU's iiJoondalup iiCampus
1. iiINTRODUCTION
1.1 What iiis iiSWMM
The iiStorm iiWater iiManagement iiModel ii(SWMM) iiis iia iidynamic iirainfall-runoff iisimulation iimodel iiused iifor iisingle iievent iior iilong-term ii(continuous) iisimulation iiof iirunoff iiquantity iiand iiquality iifrom iiprimarily iiu
an iiareas. iiThe iirunoff iicomponent iiof iiSWMM iioperates iion iia iicollection iiof iisub iicatchment iiareas iithat iireceive iiprecipitation iiand iigenerate iirunoff iiand iipollutant iiloads. iiThe iirouting iiportion iiof iiSWMM iitransports iithis iirunoff iithrough iia iisystem iiof iipipes, iichannels, iistorage/treatment iidevices, iipumps, iiand iiregulators. iiSWMM iitracks iithe iiquantity iiand iiquality iiof iirunoff iigenerated iiwithin iieach iisub iicatchment, iiand iithe iiflow iirate, iiflow iidepth, iiand iiquality iiof iiwater iiin iieach iipipe iiand iichannel iiduring iia iisimulation iiperiod iicomprised iiof iimultiple iitime iisteps.
1.2 Modelling iiCapabilities ii
SWMM iiaccounts iifor iivarious iihydrologic iiprocesses iithat iiproduce iirunoff iifrom iiareas. ii
These iiinclude: ii
· time-varying iirainfall ii
· evaporation iiof iistanding iisurface iiwater ii
· snow iiaccumulation iiand iimelting ii
· rainfall iiinterception iifrom iidepression iistorage ii
· infiltration iiof iirainfall iiinto iiunsaturated iisoil iilayers ii
· percolation iiof iiinfiltrated iiwater iiinto iigroundwater iilayers ii
· interflow iibetween iigroundwater iiand iithe iidrainage iisystem ii
· nonlinear iireservoir iirouting iiof iioverland iiflow ii
· capture iiand iiretention iiof iirainfall
unoff iiwith iivarious iitypes iiof iilow iiimpact iidevelopment ii(LID) iipractices. ii
Spatial iivariability iiin iiall iiof iithese iiprocesses iiis iiachieved iiby iidividing iia iistudy iiarea iiinto iia iicollection iiof iismaller, iihomogeneous iisub iicatchment iiareas, iieach iicontaining iiits iiown iifraction iiof iipervious iiand iiimpervious iisub-areas. iiOverland iiflow iican iibe iirouted iibetween iisub-areas, iibetween iisub iicatchments, iior iibetween iientry iipoints iiof iia iidrainage iisystem.
SWMM iialso iicontains iia iiflexible iiset iiof iihydraulic iimodeling iicapabilities iiused iito iiroute iirunoff iiand iiexternal iiinflows iithrough iia iidrainage iisystem iinetwork iiof iipipes, iichannels, iistorage/treatment iiunits iiand iidiversion iistructures. ii
These iiinclude iithe iiability iito: ii
· handle iinetworks iiof iiunlimited iisize ii
· use iia iiwide iivariety iiof iistandard iiclosed iiand iiopen iiconduit iishapes iias iiwell iias iinatural iichannels ii
· model iispecial iielements iisuch iias iistorage/treatment iiunits, iiflow iidividers, iipumps, iiweirs, iiand iiorifices ii
· apply iiexternal iiflows iiand iiwater iiquality iiinputs iifrom iisurface iirunoff, iigroundwater iiinterflow, iirainfall-dependent iiinfiltration/inflow, iidry iiweather iisanitary iiflow, iiand iiuser-defined iiinflows ii
· utilize iieither iikinematic iiwave iior iifull iidynamic iiwave iiflow iirouting iimethods ii
· model iivarious iiflow iiregimes, iisuch iias iibackwater, iisurcharging, iireverse iiflow, iiand iisurface iiponding
1.3 Typical iiApplications iiof iiSWMM ii
Since iiits iiinception, iiSWMM iihas iibeen iiused iiin iithousands iiof iisewer iiand iistormwater iistudies iithroughout iithe iiworld. ii
Typical iiapplications iiinclude: ii
· design iiand iisizing iiof iidrainage iisystem iicomponents iifor iiflood iicontrol ii
· sizing iiof iidetention iifacilities iiand iitheir iiappurtenances iifor iiflood iicontrol iiand iiwater iiquality iiprotection ii
· flood iiplain iimapping iiof iinatural iichannel iisystems ii
· designing iicontrol iistrategies iifor iiminimizing iicombined iisewer iioverflows ii
· evaluating iithe iiimpact iiof iiinflow iiand iiinfiltration iion iisanitary iisewer iioverflows ii
· generating iinon-point iisource iipollutant iiloadings iifor iiwaste iiload iiallocation iistudies
· evaluating iithe iieffectiveness iiof iiBMPs iifor iireducing iiwet iiweather iipollutant iiloadings.
2. iiSWMM iiMODEL ii
iiIt iiconceptualizes iia iidrainage iisystem iias iia iiseries iiof iiwater iiand iimaterial iiflows iibetween iiseveral iimajor iienvironmental iicompartments. ii
These iicompartments iiand iithe iiSWMM iiobjects iithey iicontain iiinclude: ii
· The iiAtmosphere iicompartment, iiwhich iigenerates iiprecipitation iiand iideposits iipollutants iionto iithe iiland iisurface iicompartment. iiSWMM iiuses iiRain iiGage iiobjects iito iirepresent iirainfall iiinputs iito iithe iisystem. ii
· The iiLand iiSurface iicompartment, iiwhich iiis iirepresented iithrough iione iior iimore iiSub iicatchment iiobjects. iiIt iireceives iiprecipitation iifrom iithe iiAtmospheric iicompartment iiin iithe iiform iiof iirain iior iisnow; iiit iisends iioutflow iiin iithe iiform iiof iiinfiltration iito iithe iiGroundwater iicompartment iiand iialso iias iisurface iirunoff iiand iipollutant iiloadings iito iithe iiTransport iicompartment. ii
· The iiGroundwater iicompartment iireceives iiinfiltration iifrom iithe iiLand iiSurface iicompartment iiand iitransfers iia iiportion iiof iithis iiinflow iito iithe iiTransport iicompartment. iiThis iicompartment iiis iimodeled iiusing iiAquifer iiobjects. ii
· The iiTransport iicompartment iicontains iia iinetwork iiof iiconveyance iielements ii(channels, iipipes, iipumps, iiand iiregulators) iiand iistorage/treatment iiunits iithat iitransport iiwater iito iioutfalls iior iito iitreatment iifacilities. iiInflows iito iithis iicompartment iican iicome iifrom iisurface iirunoff, iigroundwater iiinterflow, iisanitary iidry iiweather iiflow, iior iifrom iiuser-defined iihydrographs. iiThe iicomponents iiof iithe iiTransport iicompartment iiare iimodeled iiwith iiNode iiand iiLink iiobjects ii
2.1 iiVisual iiObjects
These iiobjects iican iibe iidisplayed iion iia iimap iiin iithe iiSWMM iiworkspace. iiThe iifollowing iisections iidescribe iieach iiof iithese iiobjects.
2.1.1 iiRain iiGages ii
Rain iiGages iisupply iiprecipitation iidata iifor iione iior iimore iisub iicatchment iiareas iiin iia iistudy iiregion. iiThe iirainfall iidata iican iibe iieither iia iiuser-defined iitime iiseries iior iicome iifrom iian iiexternal iifile. iiSeveral iidifferent iipopular iirainfall iifile iiformats iicu
ently iiin iiuse iiare iisupported, iias iiwell iias iia iistandard iiuser iidefined iiformat.
The iiprincipal iiinput iiproperties iiof iirain iigages iiinclude: ii
· rainfall iidata iitype ii(e.g., iiintensity, iivolume, iior iicumulative iivolume) ii
· recording iitime iiinterval ii(e.g., iihourly, ii15-minute, iietc.) ii
· source iiof iirainfall iidata ii(input iitime iiseries iior iiexternal iifile) ii
· name iiof iirainfall iidata iisource
2.1.2 iiSub iicatchments ii
Sub iicatchments iiare iihydrologic iiunits iiof iiland iiwhose iitopography iiand iidrainage iisystem iielements iidirect iisurface iirunoff iito iia iisingle iidischarge iipoint. iiThe iiuser iiis iiresponsible iifor iidividing iia iistudy iiarea iiinto iian iiappropriate iinumber iiof iisub iicatchments, iiand iifor iiidentifying iithe iioutlet iipoint iiof iieach iisub iicatchment. iiDischarge iioutlet iipoints iican iibe iieither iinodes iiof iithe iidrainage iisystem iior iiother iisub iicatchments.
The iiother iiprincipal iiinput iiparameters iifor iisub iicatchments iiinclude: ii
· assigned iirain iigage ii
· outlet iinode iior iisub iicatchment ii
· assigned iiland iiuses ii
· tributary iisurface iiarea ii
· imperviousness ii
· slope ii
· characteristic iiwidth iiof iioverland iiflow ii
· Manning's iin iifor iioverland iiflow iion iiboth iipervious iiand iiimpervious iiareas ii
· depression iistorage iiin iiboth iipervious iiand iiimpervious iiareas ii
· percent iiof iiimpervious iiarea iiwith iino iidepression iistorage.
2.1.3 iiJunction iiNodes ii
Junctions iiare iidrainage iisystem iinodes iiwhere iilinks iijoin iitogether. iiPhysically iithey iican iirepresent iithe iiconfluence iiof iinatural iisurface iichannels, iimanholes iiin iia iisewer iisystem, iior iipipe iiconnection iifittings. iiExternal iiinflows iican iienter iithe iisystem iiat iijunctions. iiExcess iiwater iiat iia iijunction iican iibecome iipartially iipressurized iiwhile iiconnecting iiconduits iiare iisurcharged iiand iican iieither iibe iilost iifrom iithe iisystem iior iibe iiallowed iito iipond iiatop iithe iijunction iiand iisubsequently iidrain iiback iiinto iithe iijunction. ii
The iiprincipal iiinput iiparameters iifor iia iijunction iiare: ii
· invert ii(channel iior iimanhole iibottom) iielevation
· height iito iiground iisurface ii
· ponded iisurface iiarea iiwhen iiflooded ii
· external iiinflow iidata.
2.1.4 iiStorage iiUnits ii
Storage iiUnits iiare iidrainage iisystem iinodes iithat iiprovide iistorage iivolume. iiPhysically iithey iicould iirepresent iistorage iifacilities iias iismall iias iia iicatch iibasin iior iias iilarge iias iia iilake. iiThe iivolumetric iiproperties iiof iia iistorage iiunit iiare iidescribed iiby iia iifunction iior iitable iiof iisurface iiarea iiversus iiheight. iiIn iiaddition iito iireceiving iiinflows iiand iidischarging iioutflows iito iiother iinodes iiin iithe iidrainage iinetwork, iistorage iinodes iican iialso iilose iiwater iifrom iisurface iievaporation iiand iifrom iiseepage iiinto iinative iisoil. ii
The iiprincipal iiinput iiparameters iifor iistorage iiunits iiinclude: ii
· invert ii(bottom) iielevation
· maximum iidepth ii
· depth-surface iiarea iidata ii
· evaporation iipotential
2.2 iiNon-Visual iiObjects ii
In iiaddition iito iiphysical iiobjects iithat iican iibe iidisplayed iivisually iion iia iimap, iiSWMM iiutilizes iiseveral iiclasses iiof iinon-visual iidata iiobjects iito iidescribe iiadditional iicharacteristics iiand iiprocesses iiwithin iia iistudy iiarea.
Temperature ii
Air iitemperature iidata iiare iiused iiwhen iisimulating iisnowfall iiand iisnowmelt iiprocesses iiduring iirunoff iicalculations. iiThey iican iialso iibe iiused iito iicompute iidaily iievaporation iirates. iiIf iithese iiprocesses iiare iinot iibeing iisimulated iithen iitemperature iidata iiare iinot iirequired. ii
Air iitemperature iidata iican iibe iisupplied iito iiSWMM iifrom iione iiof iithe iifollowing iisources: ii
· a iiuser-defined iitime iiseries iiof iipoint iivalues ii(values iiat iiintermediate iitimes iiare iiinterpolated) ii
· iian iiexternal iiclimate iifile iicontaining iidaily iiminimum iiand iimaximum iivalues.
Evaporation ii
Evaporation iican iioccur iifor iistanding iiwater iion iisubcatchment iisurfaces, iifor iisubsurface iiwater iiin iigroundwater iiaquifers, iifor iiwater iitraveling iithrough iiopen iichannels, iiand iifor iiwater iiheld iiin iistorage iiunits. ii
Evaporation iirates iican iibe iistated...
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