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XXXXXXXXXXpdf FIFTH EDITION MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS in Architecture, Engineering, and Construction JOSEPH B. WUJEK Advanced Building Consultants, LLC FRANK R. DAGOSTINO Prentice Hall Upper...

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XXXXXXXXXXpdf
FIFTH EDITION
MECHANICAL AND
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
in Architecture,
Engineering, and
Construction
JOSEPH B. WUJEK
Advanced Building Consultants, LLC
FRANK R. DAGOSTINO
Prentice Hall
Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Columbus, Ohio
Li
ary of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Wujek, Joseph B.
Mechanical and electrical systems in architecture, engineering, and construction / Joseph B. Wujek, Frank
Dagostino. — 5th ed.
p. cm.
Rev. ed. of Mechanical and electrical systems in construction and architecture / Frank Dagostino, Joseph B. Wujek.
ISBN-13: XXXXXXXXXX
ISBN-10: XXXXXXXXXX
1. Buildings––Mechanical equipment. 2. Buildings—Electric equipment. I. Dagostino, Frank R. II. Dagostino,
Frank R. Mechanical and electrical systems in construction and architecture. III. Title.
TH6010.D33 2010
696––dc XXXXXXXXXX
Vice President and Executive Publisher: Vernon R. Anthony
Acquisitions Editor: Eric Krassow
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is
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This book was set in Times by Aptara®, Inc. and was printed and bound by R.R. Donnelley. The cover was printed by DPC.
Copyright © 2010, 2005, 1995, 1991, 1978 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458.
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XXXXXXXXXX
ISBN-13: XXXXXXXXXX
ISBN-10: XXXXXXXXXX
www.pearsonhighered.com
This book is dedicated to my mother and father, Sophie and
Joseph Wujek, Sr., and my family. The constant encouragement
I received from my parents causes me to believe that anything
is possible through hard work. I thankfully acknowledge my
est friend and wife, Shauna, for her patience, assistance, and
guidance. Mostly, I thank her for her love and companionship. I
also recognize my sons, Blaze and Bryce. They gave Dad the
free time needed for the completion of a project of this size.
These commitments were all necessary in making this undertak-
ing possible.
I am grateful to those students, faculty, professionals, col-
leagues, and others who have contributed to this work, eithe
through direct contributions or through feedback. The many
professional associations and governmental entities that sup-
plied technical information in this book must be acknowledged.
Their cooperation and support are greatly appreciated. I thank
the following reviewers for their input: Daphene Cyr Koch,
Purdue University; Bruce W. Smith, Auburn University; and
Russell Walters, University of Florida.
The original author, the late Frank Dagostino, should be
ecognized because his insight and effort over many decades
served as a foundation for a fine book.
I am thankful to Sonya Kottcamp, Editorial Assistant,
Eric Krassow, Acquisitions Editor, and Wanda Rockwell, Pro-
duction Manager with Pearson Prentice Hall, who all worked
patiently and prudently to keep me on schedule (as best they
could). Last, Evelyn Pe
icone, my copy editor, and Nitin
Agarwal, my Project Manager, should also be recognized fo
their hard work in turning my roughly written manuscript into
its present professional form.
Joseph Wujek
iii
A C K N O W L E D G M E N T S
Mechanical and Electrical Systems in Architecture, Engineering,
and Construction, fifth edition, is for those who must have a
oad understanding of building mechanical and electrical
materials, equipment, and systems to successfully envision,
design, draw, construct, evaluate or operate a building or build-
ing project. It is written specifically for those interested in build-
ing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), plumbing
and piping (water supply and sanitary drainage), storm drainage,
illumination, electrical power distribution, building telecommu-
nications, acoustics and acoustical control, vertical/horizontal
transportation and conveying, fire protection and suppression,
and building renewable energy and energy conservation systems.
This book is intended to provide a
oad-scope introduc-
tion to building mechanical and electrical materials, equip-
ment, systems, design concepts, and engineering principles. It
presents material that can provide the future architect, archi-
tectural engineer, and architectural engineering technician
with a basic working-level knowledge of principles and practices.
The audience of this text will likely be undergraduate college
and university students in architecture, architectural technology,
architectural engineering technology, construction engineering
technology, construction management, and elementary archi-
tectural engineering.
The fifth edition of this book has been fully reformatted
and updated from the previous edition. This transformation is
intended to better accommodate its use in introductory college
and university courses. Nine chapters have been rewritten to
eflect changes in the industry and the other chapters have been
updated. Chapters on occupant transportation/conveying sys-
tems and emerging sustainability technologies have been added
to expand coverage. The new chapter, “Emerging Sustainable
Technologies,” addresses emerging building mechanical and
electrical technologies that are being incorporated into the
whole system that makes up an advanced building.
Elementary engineering concepts and design principles
are introduced in a straightforward manner. Over 150 new pho-
tographs and 40 new figures have been added to help improve
the reader’s understanding of these subjects. Topics are pre-
sented on an intermediate mathematics level, requiring that the
student have a working knowledge of college alge
a. Home-
work exercises and design problems are written with the intent
of introducing basic principles with, in most instances, real-
world connections.
A text like this is needed because those in the architecture,
engineering, and construction (AEC) industry must have an un-
derstanding of whole building design. Building mechanical and
electrical technologies are integral elements that make up the
whole building system—that is, they are really elemental sys-
tems within a single system, each of which must function and
interact effectively with the other systems. Successful integra-
tion during design and construction depends on knowledge and
teamwork of all involved—the architectural designer, the me-
chanical and electrical engineer, the technician, the draftsperson,
the construction manager, the general contractor, the subcon-
tractors, workers in the trades, and facilities managers and
personnel. All involved should be familiar with basic design
strategies, construction procedures, system characteristics, space
equirements, and the time frame and progression at which such
work must be done on the job. Simply put, everyone involved in
uilding design, construction, operation, maintenance, and de-
construction should be familiar with building mechanical and
electrical systems.
Joseph Wujek
iv
P R E F A C E
A general introduction to common building industry practices
and trends ensures that the reader has a basic understanding of
the industry. Such an understanding is beneficial because it val-
idates the need for all building industry professionals to under-
stand the subjects presented in this text: building mechanical
and electrical materials, components, equipment, and systems.
This introduction is particularly helpful to the reader who has
little or no experience in the building industry.
THE BUILDING INDUSTRY
The global architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC)
industry accounts for about 10% of the world’s gross domestic
product, 7% of all employment, and approximately half of all
esource use, including about 40% of all energy consumption.
In the United States, the AEC industry is over a trillion dolla
usiness ($1069 trillion for construction alone in XXXXXXXXXXIn 2005,
the U.S. construction industry directly employed 7.3 million
people and another 1.3 million people in architecture and engi-
neering. The AEC industry is big business in the United States
and worldwide.
In the AEC industry, architects and their support staff de-
sign buildings, while engineers and their support staff design
the engineering systems within these buildings. Constructors,
serving as contractors, and their employees and subcontractors
uild buildings. Construction managers supervise the construc-
tion project. Facilities managers and staff operate and maintain
uildings. All players must effectively work together as the
uilding design, construction, and operation team.
THE BUILDING MECHANICAL
AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
Well-designed, modern buildings are made up of many compo-
nents and pieces of equipment that are integrated so that, when
they are operated and maintained properly, they mutually per-
form as a single system. Simply put, an efficient building system
is made up of many elemental systems. In buildings, mechanical
and electrical technologies are among the most expensive and
labor-intensive of these elemental systems. These mechanical
and electrical technologies are used for heating, ventilating, and
air conditioning (HVAC), illumination, electrical power distribu-
tion, plumbing and piping (water supply and sanitary drainage),
storm drainage, building telecommunications, acoustics and
acoustical control, vertical/horizontal transportation and convey-
ing, fire protection and suppression, renewable energy sources,
heat recovery, and energy conservation.
Mechanical and electrical systems in the building con-
struction industry fit within classifications known as mechanical
electrical/plumbing (MEP) or electrical/mechanical/plumbing/fire
protection (E/M/P/FP) systems. MEP systems influence occu-
pant health, comfort, and productivity, and greatly affect costs,
including the first cost and operating (energy use and mainte-
nance) costs. MEP systems are the heart and nervous system of
a building.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF BUILDINGS
The earth’s natural resources are limited and world population
continues to increase. With the passing of each day, there is a
greater and greater reliance on natural resources and more
degradation of the environment. Buildings account for a large
amount of resource (energy and water) consumption, land use,
atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions, and generation of envi-
onmental waste and pollution.
With about 4.5% of the world’s population, the United
States consumes nearly 23% of the total global energy. This
means that the U.S. consumes energy over 5 times the world
per capita average and over 100 times more per capita than
many undeveloped countries. The United States is not alone in
its energy-use intensity. Countries like Qatar, Kuwait, Norway,
and Canada use energy at a higher per capita rate. From a
global perspective, more developed, industrialized countries
(e.g., countries in Europe,
Answered 2 days AfterMar 01, 2022

Solution

Ishwar answered on Mar 04 2022
66 Votes
Propose retrofit solutions to improve thermal performance your cu
ent house
Project 1: HVAC
Heat loss and Heat Gain Calculation
Student Name
Student ID
Part: 1
Figure: 20 x 20 x 8’ house 3D view
Figure : East side view
Figure : North side view
Figure : Top-view
1. Calculate the total Resistance and U-Factor (excluding the air film) for all (4) walls ;
1. ½ gypsum board
2. ¾" plywood
3. Vinyl siding
4. 1” rigid board
5. batt insulation
6. 2x4 wood studs
7. One 3’x5’ double-insulated glass window at the North wall only
8. One solid wood 36” x 80” x door with the metal storm door at the East wall only.
a. Area occupied by the insulation :
    Thermal conductivity
    
    ½ gypsum board
    0.254
    ¾" plywood
    0.13
    Batt insulation
    0.0364
    1” rigid board
    0.10
Total resistance:
However, the “U-factor” obtains as following;
. Area occupied by the stud :
Stud size: 2 x 4”
Consider stud thickness = 2”
Total resistance:
The “U-factor” obtains as following;
c. The average area where 85% is occupied by the insulation and 15% is occupied by the studs.
The “U-factor” obtains as following;
Part: 1.2 Find “Q” of an average area of with a high temp of 80 and a low temp of 50
Converting inch to “m” unit
Part: 2
Figure :3-D View and section view of house
Figure : Name selection
Figure : Top view (section view)
Figure : Top view with roofing
Figure : interior of house

Figure : entrance of house with solid wood 1 ¾” door with metal storm door
Figure: window view
1. ½ gypsum board
2. 4”
ick face
3. batt insulation
4. 2x4 wood studs
5. One 3’x5’ double-insulated glass window at the North wall only
6. One solid wood door with the metal storm door at the East wall only.
a. Area occupied by the insulation :
    
    Thermal conductivity
    
    1
    ½ gypsum board
    0.254
    2
    4”
ick face
    0.9
    3
    Batt insulation
    0.0364
    4
    3’x5’ double-insulated glass window
    0.780
    5
     solid wood
    0.190
    6
    Metal
    71
1.
4”
ick face:
3. Batt insulation
4. 3’x5’ double-insulated glass window
5. Solid wood
6. Metal
Total resistance:
The “U-factor” obtains as following;
. Area occupied by the studs ;
Stud size: 2 x 4”
Consider stud thickness = 2”
Total resistance:
The “U-factor” obtains as following;
c. The average area where 85% is occupied by the insulation and 15% is occupied by the studs.
The “U-factor” obtains as following;
Part: 1.2 Find “Q” of an average area of with a high temp of 80 and a low temp of 50
Converting inch to “m” unit
Part: 3 propose retrofit solutions to improve thermal performance your cu
ent house.
For making building or house thermal comfort or ensure to low energy expansion by considering su
ounding environment, there are some key aspects require to includes. For instance, the selection of right material and effective house design would be desirable for optimal thermal performance of the existing house Pombo.et.al.(2016). There is some basic aspect to ensure the retrofit solution to enhance thermal performance of house.
a. Stop escaping the air: to ensure that the wall construction, windows and doors design such a way that there would be...
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